MoboReader> Literature > The Young Bank Messenger

   Chapter 37 CONCLUSION.

The Young Bank Messenger By Jr. Horatio Alger Characters: 12380

Updated: 2017-12-01 00:02


On Tuesday Bolton returned with Ernest. Two hours were spent in conference with Stephen Ray. The latter fought hard, but had to yield in the end. He understood perfectly well the strength of his opponent's case.

Ernest consented to receive the estate as it was bequeathed to his father, without any demand for back revenues. Whatever Stephen Ray had accumulated besides, he was allowed to retain.

As this amounted to a hundred thousand dollars, Ray felt that it might have been worse. Had he not been dissuaded by Bolton, Ernest would have consented to share the estate with the usurper, but the lawyer represented that this would be condoning the wrong done to his father.

In a month the whole matter was settled, and Stephen Ray departed, removing to Chicago, in which city he had some business interests.

"But what shall I do with this large house?" asked Ernest. "I don't want to live here."

"I know of a gentleman who would like to hire it for term of years," responded Bolton. "He will pay a rental of five thousand dollars a year. The bonds which you inherit will yield an income equally large."

"So that my income will be ten thousand dollars a year?" said Ernest, dazzled.

"Yes."

"What shall I do with it all?"

Bolton smiled.

"You are but seventeen," he said. "A few years hence you will probably marry. Then you can occupy the house yourself. Meanwhile--"

"I will go back to California. Luke will expect me. While I am away I appoint you my man of business. I wish you to have charge of my property at a proper commission."

"I will undertake the charge with pleasure."

Bolton knew how much this would increase his importance in the eyes of the firm by which he was employed. Still, Ernest could not have made a better choice. Bolton was no longer intemperate. He was shrewd and keen, and loyal to his young employer.

Ernest returned to California, but he had lost his old zest for business, now that his fortune was secure. He soon came East again, and entered upon a plan of systematic study, ending with a collegiate course. He brought with him Frank Fox, the son of the dead outlaw, who regarded him with devoted affection. They lived together, and he placed Frank at a well-known school, justly noted for the success of its pupils.

Of the many boys with whom Frank was associated not one suspected that the attractive lad, who was a favorite with all, was a son of the noted desperado whose deeds had been commemorated in dime novels and were a matter of common knowledge in the West. Ernest had cautioned the boy to say as little as possible of his past history.

Years have gone by, and what Bolton predicted has come to pass. Ernest is a young man, a college graduate, and he will soon be married to a young lady of high position in the city of New York. He will go abroad for a year, and on his return will take up his home on his ancestral estate.

Last week he received a letter from a patient in a New York City hospital. It was signed John Franklin, a name with which he was not familiar.

In some wonder he answered the call, and was led to a bed on which lay a gaunt, spectral man, evidently in the last stage of existence.

"Is this John Franklin?" asked Ernest, doubtfully.

"That is the name I go by now," answered the dying man.

"Do I know you? Have I ever met you?"

"Yes."

"I don't remember you."

"If I tell you my real name, will you keep it secret?"

"Yes."

"Then I am John Fox."

"What! the noted outlaw?"

"I am all that is left of him. You will not betray me?"

"No; certainly not. Can I do anything for you?"

"Yes; you were left the guardian of my brother's child?"

"Yes."

"Is he alive? Is he well?"

"Yes."

"Will you bring him here? Will you let me see him before I die?"

"I will. I cannot refuse the request of a dying man."

So Ernest brought Frank to the bedside of his dying uncle. It was a sad interview. Frank was moved, but John Fox, seeing him strong, handsome, robust, felt comforted.

"He at least has profited by the fate that overtook his father and myself. I shall die content, for I leave him in good hands. Don't let him think too hardly of us!"

"I will not. And so far as I can compass it, his future life shall be happy."

The dying outlaw reached out his hand and pressed Ernest's gratefully. A day later, and he was dead.

* * *

THE JOHN C. WINSTON CO.'S POPULAR JUVENILES.

L. T. TROWBRIDGE.

Neither as a writer does he stand apart from the great currents of life and select some exceptional phase or odd combination of circumstances. He stands on the common level and appeals to the universal heart, and all that he suggests or achieves is on the plane and in the line of march of the great body of humanity.

The Jack Hazard series of stories, published in the late Our Young Folks, and continued in the first volume of St. Nicholas, under the title of "Fast Friends," is no doubt destined to hold a high place in this class of literature. The delight of the boys in them (and of their seniors, too) is well founded. They go to the right spot every time. Trowbridge knows the heart of a boy like a book, and the heart of a man, too, and he has laid them both open in these books in a most successful manner. Apart from the qualities that render the series so attractive to all young readers, they have great value on account of their portraitures of American country life and character. The drawing is wonderfully accurate, and as spirited as it is true. The constable, Sellick, is an original character, and as minor figures where will we find anything better than Miss Wansey, and Mr. P. Pipkin, Esq. The picture of Mr. Dink's school, too, is capital, and where else in fiction is there a better nick-name than that the boys gave to poor little Stephen Treadwell, "Step Hen," as he himself pronounced his name in an unfortunate moment when he saw it in print for the first time in his lesson in school.

On the whole, these books are very satisfactory, and afford the critical reader the rare pleasure of the works that are just adequate, that easily fulfill themselves and accomplish all they set out to do. --S

cribner's Monthly.

JACK HAZARD SERIES.

6 vols. By J.T. TROWBRIDGE $7.25

Jack Hazard and His Fortunes

The Young Surveyor.

Fast Friends.

Doing His Best.

A Chance for Himself.

Lawrence's Adventures.

CHARLES ASBURY STEPHENS.

"This author wrote his "Camping Out Series" at the very height of his mental and physical powers.

"We do not wonder at the popularity of these books; there is a freshness and variety about them, and an enthusiasm in the description of sport and adventure, which even the older folk can hardly fail to share." --Worcester Spy.

"The author of the Camping Out Series is entitled to rank as decidedly at the head of what may be called boys' literature."--Buffalo Courier.

CAMPING OUT SERIES. By C. A. STEPHENS.

All books in this series are 12mo. with eight full page illustrations. Cloth, extra, 75 cents.

CAMPING OUT. As Recorded by "Kit."

"This book is bright, breezy, wholesome, instructive, and stands above the ordinary boys books of the day by a whole head and shoulders." --The Christian Register, Boston.

LEFT ON LABRADOR; OR, THE CRUISE OF THE SCHOONER YACHT "CURLEW." As Recorded by "Wash."

"The perils of the voyagers, the narrow escapes, their strange expedients, and the fun and jollity when danger had passed, will make boys even unconscious of hunger." --New Bedford Mercury.

OFF TO THE GEYSERS; OR THE YOUNG YACHTERS IN ICELAND. As Recorded by "Wade."

"It is difficult to believe that Wade and Read and Kit and Wash were not live boys, sailing up Hudson Straits, and reigning temporarily over an Esquimaux tribe." --The Independent, New York.

LYNX HUNTING: From Notes by the Author of "Camping Out."

"Of first quality as a boys' book, and fit to take its place beside the best." --Richmond Enquirer.

Fox HUNTING. As Recorded by "Raed."

"The most spirited and entertaining book that has as yet appeared. It overflows with incident, and is characterized by dash and brilliancy throughout." --Boston Gazette.

ON THE AMAZON; OR, THE CRUISE OF THE "RAMBLER." As Recorded by "Wash."

"Gives vivid pictures of Brazilian adventure and scenery." --Buffalo Courier.

HARRY CASTLEMON.

HOW I CAME TO WRITE MY FIRST BOOK.

When I was sixteen years old I belonged to a composition class. It was our custom to go on the recitation seat every day with clean slates, and we were allowed ten minutes to write seventy words on any subject the teacher thought suited to our capacity. One day he gave out "What a Man Would See if He Went to Greenland." My heart was in the matter, and before the ten minutes were up I had one side of my slate filled. The teacher listened to the reading of our compositions, and when they were all over he simply said: "Some of you will make your living by writing one of these days." That gave me something to ponder upon. I did not say so out loud, but I knew that my composition was as good as the best of them. By the way, there was another thing that came in my way just then. I was reading at that time one of Mayne Reid's works which I had drawn from the library, and I pondered upon it as much as I did upon what the teacher said to me. In introducing Swartboy to his readers he made use of this expression: "No visible change was observable in Swartboy's countenance." Now, it occurred to me that if a man of his education could make such a blunder as that and still write a book, I ought to be able to do it, too. I went home that very day and began a story, "The Old Guide's Narrative," which was sent to the New York Weekly, and came back, respectfully declined. It was written on both sides of the sheets but I didn't know that this was against the rules. Nothing abashed, I began another, and receiving some instruction, from a friend of mine who was a clerk in a book store, I wrote it on only one side of the paper. But mind you, he didn't know what I was doing. Nobody knew it; but one day, after a hard Saturday's work--the other boys had been out skating on the brick-pond--I shyly broached the subject to my mother. I felt the need of some sympathy. She listened in amazement, and then said: "Why, do you think you could write a book like that?" That settled the matter, and from that day no one knew what I was up to until I sent the first four volumes of Gunboat Series to my father. Was it work? Well, yes; it was hard work, but each week I had the satisfaction of seeing the manuscript grow until the "Young Naturalist" was all complete.

--Harry Castlemon in the Writer.

GUNBOAT SERIES.

6 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $6.00

Frank the Young Naturalist.

Frank on a Gunboat.

Frank in the Woods.

Frank before Vicksburg.

Frank on the Lower Mississippi.

Frank on the Prairie.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SERIES.

3 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $3.00

Frank Among the Rancheros.

Frank in the Mountains.

Frank at Don Carlos Rancho.

SPORTSMAN'S CLUB SERIES.

3 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $3.75

The Sportsman's Club in the Saddle.

The Sportsman's Club Among the Trappers.

The Sportsman's Club Afloat.

FRANK NELSON SERIES.

3 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $3.75

Snowed up.

Frank in the Forecastle.

The Boy Traders.

ROUGHING IT SERIES.

3 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $3.00

George in Camp.

George at the Fort.

George at the Wheel.

ROD AND GUN SERIES.

3 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $3.00

Don Gordon's Shooting Box.

The Young Wild Fowlers.

Rod and Gun Club.

GO-AHEAD SERIES.

3 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $3.00

Tom Newcombe.

Go-Ahead.

No Moss.

WAR SERIES,

6 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $6.00

True to His Colors.

Marcy the Blockade-Runner.

Rodney the Partisan.

Marcy the Refugee.

Rodney the Overseer.

Sailor Jack the Trader.

HOUSEBOAT SERIES.

3 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $3.00

The Houseboat Boys.

The Mystery of Lost River Canon.

The Young Game Warden.

AFLOAT AND ASHORE SERIES.

3 vols. BY HARRY CASTLEMON. $3.00

Rebellion in Dixie.

A Sailor in Spite of Himself.

The Ten-Ton Cutter.

COMPLETE CATALOG OF BEST BOOKS FOR BOYS AND GIRLS MAILED ON

APPLICATION TO THE PUBLISHERS

THE JOHN C. WINSTON CO., PHILADELPHIA

Free to Download MoboReader
(← Keyboard shortcut) Previous Contents (Keyboard shortcut →)
 Novels To Read Online Free

Scan the QR code to download MoboReader app.

Back to Top

shares