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   Chapter 28 MY EIGHTIETH BIRTHDAY.

Eighty Years and More; Reminiscences 1815-1897 By Elizabeth Cady Stanton Characters: 37968

Updated: 2017-12-01 00:04


Without my knowledge or consent, my lifelong friend, Susan B. Anthony, who always seems to appreciate homage tendered to me more highly than even to herself, made arrangements for the celebration of my eightieth birthday, on the 12th day of November, 1895. She preferred that this celebration should be conducted by the National Council of Women, composed of a large number of organizations representing every department of woman's labor, though, as the enfranchisement of woman had been my special life work, it would have been more appropriate if the celebration had been under the auspices of the National Woman's Suffrage Association.

Mrs. Mary Lowe Dickinson, President of the National Council of Women, assumed the financial responsibility and the extensive correspondence involved, and with rare tact, perseverance, and executive ability made the celebration a complete success. In describing this occasion I cannot do better than to reproduce, in part, Mrs. Dickinson's account, published in The Arena:

"In the month of June, 1895, the National Council of Women issued the following invitation:

"'Believing that the progress made by women in the last half century may be promoted by a more general notice of their achievements, we propose to hold, in New York city, a convention for this purpose. As an appropriate time for such a celebration, the eightieth birthday of Elizabeth Cady Stanton has been chosen. Her half century of pioneer work for the rights of women makes her name an inspiration for such an occasion and her life a fitting object for the homage of all women.

"'This National Council is composed of twenty organizations; these and all other societies interested are invited to co-operate in grateful recognition of the debt the present generation owes to the pioneers of the past. From their interest in the enfranchisement of women, the influence of Mrs. Stanton and her coadjutor, Miss Anthony, has permeated all departments of progress and made them a common center round which all interested in woman's higher development may gather.'

"To this invitation came responses, from the Old World and the New, expressing sympathy with the proposed celebration, which was intended to emphasize a great principle by showing the loftiness of character that had resulted from its embodiment in a unique personality. The world naturally thinks of the personality before it thinks of the principle. It has, at least, so much unconscious courtesy left as to honor a noble woman, even when failing to rightly apprehend a noble cause. To afford this feeling its proper expression, to render more tangible all vague sympathy, to crystallize the growing sentiment in favor of human freedom, to give youth the opportunity to reverence the glory of age, to give hearts their utterances in word and song was perhaps the most popular purpose of the reunion. In other words, it gave an opportunity for those who revered Mrs. Stanton as a queen among women to show their reverence, and to recognize the work her life had wrought, and to see in it an epitome of the progress of a century.

"The celebration was also an illustration of the distinctive idea of the National Council of Women, which aims to give recognition to all human effort without demanding uniformity of opinion as a basis of co-operation. It claims to act upon a unity of service, notwithstanding differences of creed and methods. The things that separate, shrank back into the shadows where they belong, and all hearts brave enough to think, and tender enough to feel, found it easy to unite in homage to a life which had known a half century of struggle to lift humanity from bondage and womanhood from shame.

"This reunion was the first general recognition of the debt the present owes to the past. It was the first effort to show the extent to which later development has been inspired and made possible by the freedom to think and work claimed in that earlier time by women like Lucretia Mott, Lucy Stone, Mrs. Stanton, and many others whose names stand as synonyms of noble service for the race. To those who looked at the reunion from this point of view it could not fail of inspiration.

"For the followers in lines of philanthropic work to look in the faces and hear the voices of women like Clara Barton and Mary Livermore; for the multitude enlisted in the crowded ranks of literature to feel in the living presence, what literature owes to women like Julia Ward Howe; for the white ribbon army to turn from its one great leader of to-day whose light, spreading to the horizon, does not obscure or dim the glory of the crusade leaders of the past; for art lovers and art students to call to mind sculptors like Harriet Hosmer and Anna Whitney, and remember the days when art was a sealed book to women; for the followers of the truly divine art of healing to honor the Blackwell sisters and the memory of Mme. Clemence Lozier; for the mercy of surgery to reveal itself in the face of Dr. Cushier, who has proved for us that heart of pity and hand of skill need never be divorced; for women lifting their eyes to meet the face of Phebe A. Hanaford and Anna Shaw and other women who to-day in the pulpit, as well as out of it, may use a woman's right to minister to needy souls; for the ofttime sufferers from unrighteous law to welcome women lawyers; for the throng of working women to read backward through the story of four hundred industries to their beginning in the 'four,' and remember that each new door had opened because some women toiled and strove; for all these the exercises were a part of a great thanksgiving paean, each phase of progress striking its own chord, and finding each its echo in the hearts that held it dear.

"To the student of history, or to him who can read the signs of the times, there was such a profound significance in this occasion as makes one shrink from dwelling too much upon the external details. Yet as a pageant only it was a most inspiring sight, and one truly worthy of a queen. Indeed as we run the mind back over the pages of history, what queen came to a more triumphant throne in the hearts of a grateful people? What woman ever before sat silver-crowned, canopied with flowers, surrounded not by servile followers but by men and women who brought to her court the grandest service they had wrought, their best thought crystallized in speech and song. Greater than any triumphal procession that ever marked a royal passage through a kingdom was it to know that in a score or more of cities, in many a village church on that same night festive fires were lighted, and the throng kept holiday, bringing for tribute not gold and gems but noblest aspirations, truest gratitude, and highest ideals for the nation and the race.

"The great meeting was but one link in a chain; yet with its thousands of welcoming faces, with its eloquence of words, with its offering of sweetest song from the children of a race that once was bound but now is free, with its pictured glimpses of the old time and the new flashing out upon the night, with the home voices offering welcome and gratitude and love, with numberless greetings, from the great, true, brave souls of many lands, it was indeed a wonderful tribute, worthy of the great warm heart of a nation that offered it, and worthy of the woman so revered.

"It seemed fitting that Mme. Antoinette Sterling, who, twenty years ago, took her wonderful voice away to England, where it won for her a unique place in the hearts of the nation, should, on returning to her country, give her first service to the womanhood of her native land. 'I am coming a week earlier,' so she had written, 'that my first work in my own beloved America may be done for women. I am coming as a woman and not as an artist, and because I so glory in that which the women of my country have achieved.' So when she sang out of her heart, 'O rest in the Lord; wait patiently for him!' no marvel that it seemed to lift all listening hearts to a recognition of the divine secret and source of power for all work.

"One charming feature of the entertainment was a series of pictures called 'Then and Now,' each illustrating the change in woman's condition during the last fifty years. And after this, upon the dimness there shone out, one after another, the names of noble women like Mary Lyon, Maria Mitchell, Emma Willard, and many others who have passed away. Upon the shadows and the silence broke Mme. Sterling's voice in Tennyson's 'Crossing the Bar.' And when this was over, as with one voice, the whole audience sang softly 'Auld Lang Syne.'

"And last but not least should be mentioned the greetings that poured in a shower of telegrams and letters from every section of the country, and many from over the sea. These expressions, not only of personal congratulation for Mrs. Stanton, but utterances of gladness for the progress in woman's life and thought, for the conditions, already so much better than in the past, and for the hope for the future, would make of themselves a most interesting and wonderful chapter. Among them may be mentioned letters from Lord and Lady Aberdeen, from Lady Henry Somerset and Frances E. Willard, from Canon Wilberforce, and many others, including an address from thirty members of the family of John Bright, headed by his brother, the Right Honorable Jacob Bright; a beautifully engrossed address, on parchment, from the National Woman Suffrage Society of Scotland, an address from the London Women's Franchise League, and a cablegram from the Bristol Women's Liberal Association; a letter from the Women's Rights Society of Finland, signed by its president, Baroness Gripenberg of Helsingfors; telegrams from the California Suffrage Pioneers; and others from the Chicago Woman's Club, from the Toledo and Ohio Woman's Suffrage Society, from the son of the Rev. Dr. William Ellery Channing, and a telegram and letter from citizens and societies of Seneca Falls, New York, accompanied with flowers and many handsome pieces of silver from the different societies. There were also letters from Hon. Oscar S. Strauss, ex-minister to Turkey, Miss Ellen Terry, and scores of others. An address was received from the Women's Association of Utah, accompanied by a beautiful onyx and silver ballot box; and from the Shaker women of Mount Lebanon came an ode; a solid silver loving cup from the New York City Suffrage League, presented on the platform with a few appropriate words by its President, Mrs. Devereux Blake.

"Hundreds of organizations and societies, both in this country and abroad, wished to have their names placed on record as in sympathy with the movement. Many organizations were present in a body, and one was reminded, by the variety and beauty of the decorations of their boxes, of the Venetian Carnival, as the occupants gazed down from amid the silken banners and the flowers, upon the throng below. The whole occasion was indeed a unique festival, unique in its presentation, as well as in its purpose, plan, character, and spirit. No woman present could fail to be impressed with what we owe to the women of the past, and especially to this one woman who was the honored guest of the occasion. And no young woman could desire to forget the picture of this aged form as, leaning upon her staff, Mrs. Stanton spoke to the great audience of over six thousand, as she had spoken hundreds of times before in legislative halls, and whenever her word could influence the popular sentiment in favor of justice for all mankind."

My birthday celebration, with all the testimonials of love and friendship I received, was an occasion of such serious thought and deep feeling as I had never before experienced. Having been accustomed for half a century to blame rather than praise, I was surprised with such a manifestation of approval; I could endure any amount of severe criticism with complacency, but such an outpouring of homage and affection stirred me profoundly. To calm myself during that week of excitement, I thought many times of Michelet's wise motto, "Let the weal and woe of humanity be everything to you, their praise and blame of no effect; be not puffed up with the one nor cast down with the other."

Naturally at such a time I reviewed my life, its march and battle on the highways of experience, and counted its defeats and victories. I remembered when a few women called the first convention to discuss their disabilities, that our conservative friends said: "You have made a great mistake, you will be laughed at from Maine to Texas and beyond the sea; God has set the bounds of woman's sphere and she should be satisfied with her position." Their prophecy was more than realized; we were unsparingly ridiculed by the press and pulpit both in England and America. But now many conventions are held each year in both countries to discuss the same ideas; social customs have changed; laws have been modified; municipal suffrage has been granted to women in England and some of her colonies; school suffrage has been granted to women in half of our States, municipal suffrage in Kansas, and full suffrage in four States of the Union. Thus the principle scouted in 1848 was accepted in England in 1870, and since then, year by year, it has slowly progressed in America until the fourth star shone out on our flag in 1896, and Idaho enfranchised her women! That first convention, considered a "grave mistake" in 1848, is now referred to as "a grand step in progress."

My next mistake was when, as president of the New York State Woman's Temperance Association, I demanded the passage of a statute allowing wives an absolute divorce for the brutality and intemperance of their husbands. I addressed the Legislature of New York a few years later when a similar bill was pending, and also large audiences in several of our chief cities, and for this I was severely denounced. To-day fugitives from such unholy ties can secure freedom in many of the Western States, and enlightened public sentiment sustains mothers in refusing to hand down an appetite fraught with so many evil consequences. This, also called a "mistake" in 1860, was regarded as a "step in progress" a few years later.

Again, I urged my coadjutors by speeches, letters, and resolutions, as a means of widespread agitation, to make the same demands of the Church that we had already made of the State. They objected, saying, "That is too revolutionary, an attack on the Church would injure the suffrage movement." But I steadily made the demand, as opportunity offered, that women be ordained to preach the Gospel and to fill the offices as elders, deacons, and trustees. A few years later some of these suggestions were accepted. Some churches did ordain women as pastors over congregations of their own, others elected women deaconesses, and a few churches allowed women, as delegates, to sit in their conferences. Thus this demand was in a measure honored and another "step in progress" taken.

In 1882 I tried to organize a committee to consider the status of women in the Bible, and the claim that the Hebrew Writings were the result of divine inspiration. It was thought very presumptuous for women not learned in languages and ecclesiastical history to undertake such work. But as we merely proposed to comment on what was said of women in plain English, and found these texts composed only one-tenth of the Old and New Testaments, it did not seem to me a difficult or dangerous undertaking. However, when Part I. of "The Woman's Bible" was published, again there was a general disapproval by press and pulpit, and even by women themselves, expressed in resolutions in suffrage and temperance conventions. Like other "mistakes," this too, in due time, will be regarded as "a step in progress."

Such experiences have given me confidence in my judgment, and patience with the opposition of my coadjutors, with whom on so many points I disagree. It requires no courage now to demand the right of suffrage, temperance legislation, liberal divorce laws, or for women to fill church offices-these battles have been fought and won and the principle governing these demands conceded. But it still requires courage to question the divine inspiration of the Hebrew Writings as to the position of woman. Why should the myths, fables, and allegories of the Hebrews be held more sacred than those of the Assyrians and Egyptians, from whose literature most of them were derived? Seeing that the religious superstitions of women perpetuate their bondage more than all other adverse influences, I feel impelled to reiterate my demands for justice, liberty, and equality in the Church as well as in the State.

The birthday celebration was to me more than a beautiful pageant; more than a personal tribute. It was the dawn of a new day for the Mothers of the Race! The harmonious co-operation of so many different organizations, with divers interests and opinions, in one grand jubilee was, indeed, a heavenly vision of peace and hope; a prophecy that with the exaltation of Womanhood would come new Life, Light, and Liberty to all mankind.

* * *

INDEX OF NAMES.

Aberdeen, Lord and Lady, 463

Addington, Laura, 282

Albert, Prince, 398

Alcott, A. Bronson, 127, 132, 134, 260, 449

Alcott, Louisa M., 157

Allison, Miss, 315, 316

Amberly, Lord and Lady, 430

Ames, Mary Clemmer, 263

Anderson, Dr. Garrett, 371

André, Major John, 3

Andrews, Governor John A., 236

Anthony, Daniel, 157, 159, 193

Anthony, Senator Henry B., 330

Anthony, Lucy, 193

Anthony, Mary, 182, 193, 389, 434

Anthony, Susan B., 155, 157, 160-165, 167, 169-184, 187, 189, 190, 192-194, 203,210, 212-214, 219, 226, 227, 236, 337, 242

243, 245, 253, 254, 256-258, 265, 267, 271,283, 290, 292, 293, 297, 299, 306, 309, 312,313, 317, 323, 326, 330, 332, 334-337, 351,364-366, 368, 373-375, 378, 380, 385, 387,389, 392, 411-414, 420, 433, 434, 449, 452,458-459

Arnold, General Benedict, 3

Arnold, Matthew, 260, 353

Astor, John Jacob, 454

Auchet, Hubertine, 177

Austin, Dr. Harriet N., 203

Ayer, Mrs. J.C., 401

Backus, Wealthea, 67

Bagley, Governor, 303, 305

Bagley, Mrs., 303, 401

Baird, General, 52, 298

Baldwin, Elizabeth McMartin, 380

Balgarnie, Miss, 394

Banning, Ella B., 277

Banning, William L., 276, 277

Barclay, Cornelia, 68

Barrau, Caroline de, 394

Bartlett, Paul, 404

Barton, Clara, 157, 460

Bascom, Mr., 144

Bascora, Mary, 153

Bayard, Dr. Edward, 26, 97, 14, 45, 46

Bayard, Henry, 8, 26, 27, 28, 32, 34

Bayard, Thomas F., 8

Bayard, Tryphena Cady, 26, 144, 428

Beach, Myron, 279

Beaman, Rev. Dr., 41

Becker, Lydia, 352, 356, 368, 373, 374, 408

Beecher, Catharine, 264

Beecher, Rev. Henry Ward, 226, 260

Bellamy, Edward, 135

Bellows, Rev. Henry, 240, 257

Benedict, Lewis, 216

Bently, Judge, 265

Berry, Mme., 343

Berry, Marguerite, 331

Berry

, Mrs., 282

Bertaux, Mme. Léon, 403

Besant, Annie, 353, 369

Bickerdyke, Mother, 253

Biddle, Chapman, 64

Biddle, George, 67

Biggs, Caroline, 364, 373, 374, 394, 408

Bigelow, John, 401

Bigelow, Mrs. John, 401

Bingham, John A., 289

Bird, Frank W., 330

Birney, James Gr., 54, 73-76, 79, 83, 85,89 103, 107

Bjornson, Bjornstjorne, 401

Blackburn, Miss, 408

Blackwell, Antoinette Brown, 243, 461

Blackwell, Dr. Elizabeth, 157, 352, 374, 461

Blackwell, H.B., 245

Blaine, Senator James G., 379, 380, 401

Blaine, Mrs. James G., 401

Blair, Senator Henry W., 420

Blake, Lillie Devereux, 312, 378, 383, 387, 448, 453, 464

Blatch, Harriot Stanton, 325, 336, 337, 339, 363, 390-392, 394, 395, 397, 410, 418, 420-422, 429, 431, 451

Blatch, Nora Stanton, 374, 394, 426, 428, 429

Blatch, William H., 348, 367, 370, 389

Blavatsky, Mme., 377

Bloomer, Amelia, 163, 200, 201

Bogelot, Isabella, 400

Bogue, Rev. Dr., 152

Bonaparte, Napoleon, 95, 96, 266, 277

Botta, Anne Lynch, 440

Boucherett, Jessie, 264, 357

Bowles, Samuel, 127

Bradburn, George, 81

Bradlaugh, Hon. Charles, M, P., 260, 262, 360, 366, 369

Bradwell, Myra, 317

Bright, Hon. Jacob, M.P., 178, 358, 373, 374, 463

Bright, Mrs. Jacob, 358, 368, 372-374, 394, 423, 429

Bright, Hon. John, M.P., 353, 357, 365, 366, 372, 463

Broomall, John M., 243, 244

Brougham, Henry, Lord, 89, 217, 333

Brown, Antoinette L., 189, 194, 218, 219

Brown, John, 7, 54, 245

Brown, Olympia, 245

Brown, Mr., 282

Browne, Sir Thomas, M.D., 406

Browning, Robert, 360

Brownson, Orestes A., 133

Bryan, William J.. 456

Bryant, Miss, 401

Bryant, William Cullen, 418

Bullard, Laura Curtis, 182, 341, 388

Burlingame, Anson, 197

Burleigh, Celia, 293

Burleigh, Mrs. William, 203

Burnet, Rev. J., 80

Burr, Frances Ellen, 453

Burroughs, Herbert, 429

Busbey, L. White, 401

Bushnell, Horace, 271

Butler, General Benjamin F., 300

Butler, Josephine, 352, 367

Byron, Lady, 80, 88

Byron, Lord, 88

Cabot, Frederick, 134, 327, 392, 449

Cady, Judge Daniel, 2, 3, 51, 89

Cady, Eleazer, 17, 18

Cady, Margaret Livingston, 3, 89

Caird, Mona, 409

Cameron, Judge Hugh, 273

Carlisle, Lora and Lady, 430

Carlyle, Thomas, 363

Carnegie, Andrew, 395

Carroll, Anna, 242

Cary, Alice, 157, 173, 263, 264

Cary, Phoebe, 157, 173, 263, 264

Channing, Rev. Dr. William Ellery, 464

Channing, Dr. William F., 327, 330,

Channing, Rev. William Henry, 134, 135, 144, 150, 155, 159, 161, 187, 189, 191, 329, 351, 449, 464

Chant, Ormiston, 408

Chapman, Maria, 80, 127, 129

Chase, William, 134

Cheever, Rev. George B., 54, 237

Child, Lydia Maria, 80, 127, 277

Choate, Joseph H., 451

Christie, Margaret, 47

Clark, Helen Bright, 364, 365, 372

Clarkson, Thomas, 82, 91

Cleveland, Grover, 379, 380

Clinton, Governor De Witt C, 450

Cluseret, General, 402

Cobb, Mr. and Mrs., 430, 431

Cobbe, Frances Power, 352, 362, 363, 382

Cobden, Jane, 364

Cochrane, James, 68

Cochrane, General John, 52, 55, 64, 70

Cochrane, Mary, 64

Colby, Clara B., 416, 420, 453

Cole, Senator Cornelius, 289

Coleridge, Lady, 425

Collyer, Rev. Robert, 327

Combe, Andrew, 115

Comte, Auguste, 395

Conkling, Judge Alfred, 52

Conkling, Roscoe, 52, 66

Conway, Rev. Moncure D., 356, 392, 451

Conway, Mrs. Moncure D., 356, 392, 439

Cooley, Judge Thomas M., 269, 270

Couzins, Phoebe W., 294, 312, 323, 420

Croly, Jennie C, 387

Crowninshield, Captain A.S., 154

Crowninshield, Mary, 153

Cox, S.S., 293

Coxe, Bishop, 66

Curtis, George William, 180, 240, 260,353

Cushier, Dr., 461

Cushman, Charlotte, 157

Dana, Charles A., 134, 448, 449

Dana, Eunice MacDaniel, 449

Darling, Anna B., 173

Darlington, Chandler, 267

Darlington, Hannah, 267

Davis, Edward M., 327, 382, 392

Davis. Paulina Wright, 150, 181, 194, 203, 243

Davitt, Michael. 366

Depesyrons, Professor, 348

Deraismes, Mme. Féresse, 400

Deraismes, Maria, 400

Dickinson, Anna E., 242, 260, 265, 266, 294, 353

Dickinson, Mary Lowe, 458

Dietrick, Ellen Battelle, 423, 453

Dilke, Mrs. Ashton, 408, 410

Dilke, Sir Charles, 360, 422

Dix, Dorothy, L., 305

Dix, General John A., 127

Douglass, Frederick, 54, 127, 144, 149, 180, 240, 260, 355, 401, 453, 454

Douglass, Mr., 457

Dowden, Professor, 379, 394

Dudley, Blandina Bleecker, 54

Dumas, Alexandre, 454

Durand, Mme. M.E., 388, 401

Dyer, Charles Gifford, 401

Dyer, Hella, 401

Eaton, Professor Amos B., 444

Eaton, Daniel C, 72, 108, 143

Eaton, Harriet Cady, 72, 108, 143

Eddy, Miss, 385

Eddy, Mrs. Jackson, 128, 182, 385

Edmunds, Senator George F., 174

Eliot, George, 382

Euet, Elizabeth F., 214

Ellsler, Fanny, 316

Elmy, Mrs., 358

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 127, 147, 150

England, Isaac W., 322

England, Mrs. Isaac W., 322

Everett, Charles, 335

Fabre, Senator Joseph, 402

Fairchild, Governor Lucius, 271

Faithful, Emily, 368

Farnham, Mrs., 305

Fawcett, Henry, M.P., 370, 371

Fawcett, Milicent J., 371, 374

Ferry, Jules, 177, 402

Ferry, Senator Thomas W., 312

Field, Rev. Dr. Henry M., 401

Field, Kate, 260, 423

Fine, Judge, 150

Finney, Rev. Charles G., 41, 42

Fitzhugh, Ann Carroll, 52, 70

Fitzhugh, Miss, 74

Folsom, Abigail, 130

Forbes, Arethusa, 323

Forney, John W., 329

Foster, Abby Kelly, 243, 316

Foster, Rachel, 413

Foster, Stephen, 54, 127, 243

Frederic, Harold, 7

Fremont, General John C, 403

French, Daniel C, 401

Frothingham, Rev. O.B., 226

Fronde, James Anthony, 363

Fry, Elizabeth, 80, 84, 87, 305

Fuller, Kate, 401

Fuller, Margaret, 449

Fuller, W.J.A., 401

Furness, Rev. William H., 311

Gage, Frances Dana, 194

Gage, Matilda Joslyn, 144, 179, 309, 312, 313, 323, 326, 328, 329, 382, 420

Gardener, Helen H., 392, 413

Garibaldi, General G., 403

Garrison, Gertrude, 392

Garrison, William Lloyd, 54, 81, 84, 91, 128, 129, 131, 150, 163, 169, 174, 213, 214, 219, 236, 243, 257, 267, 355, 435

Garrison, Mrs. W.L., 128, 129

Gay, Sidney Howard, 127

Geddes, Mr., 150

George, Henry, 450

Gestefeld, Ursula N., 453

Gibbons, Abby Hopper, 214, 243

Gillespie, Mrs., 314

Gladstone, Right Hon., William E., 360

Gladstone, Mrs. W.E., 397

Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, 427

Godwin, William, 427

Grant, General, Ulysses S., 96, 388

Greeley, Horace, 152, 209, 215, 220, 226, 336, 240, 291

Greeley, Mrs. Horace, 134

Greene, Beriah, 54, 144, 210

Greenough, Mrs. W.H., 263

Greenwood, Grace, 401

Gréville, Henri, 388, 401

Grévy, President Jules, 402

Grévy, Mme. Jules, 402

Grew, Mary, 78

Grey, Maria G., 357

Grimké, Angelina, 80, 203, 266

Grimké, Sarah, 80, 203

Gripenberg, Baroness Alexandra, 410, 463

Gurney, John Joseph, 35

Gurney, Samuel, 85-88

Gustafsen, Mrs., 410

Hammond, Dr. William A., 413

Hanaford, Rev. Phebe A., 453, 461

Harbert, Elizabeth Boynton, 323, 387

Harberton, Lady, 204

Harvey, Rev. A., 80

Hawley, General Joseph R., 310, 311,

Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 107

Hazeltine, Mayo W., 329

Heine, Heinrich, 407

Hertell, Judge 150

Hertz, Fannie, 359, 360

Hicks, Elias, 84

Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 179

Hill, Octavia, 352

Hill, President, 434

Hinckley, Rev. Frederick A., 331

Hoar, Senator George F., 388

Hoggan, Dr. Frances E., 357

Hoisington, Rev. William, 220

Holmes, Oliver Wendell, 108, 110, 141, 394

Hooker, Isabella Beecher, 330, 420, 448

Holyoake, George Jacob, 150

Hosack, Rev. Simon, 5, 21

Hoskins, Frances, 153

Hosmer, Harriet, 157, 374, 461

Hovey, Charles, 127

Howe, Julia Ward, 260, 460

Howell, Judge, 443

Howell, Mary Seymour, 383

Howells, William D., 356

Howells, Mrs. William D., 356

Howitt, Mary, 65

Hudson, Harriet, 443

Hugo, Victor, 429

Hunt, Jane, 148

Hunt, Dr. Harriet K., 172, 194, 243, 316

Hunt, Judge Ward, 179

Hunt, Richard, 148

Hurlbert, Judge, 197

Huron, Mr., 274

Hutchinson, Family, 131, 313

Hutchins, Mr., 291, 292

Hyacinthe, Père, 401

Ingersoll, Robert G., 132, 414

Jackson, Francis, 127, 182, 385

Jackson, Dr. James, 419

Jackson, Dr. Kate, 419

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs., 424

Jackson, Mrs., 422, 424

Jacobi, Dr. Mary Putnam, 451

Jameson, Anna, 80

Janes, Bishop, 294, 295

Jarvis, Helen, 203

Jenckes, Thomas A., 243, 244

Jenkins, Lydia, 203

Jenney, Mr. and Mrs., 270

Johnson, Adelaide, 433, 434

Johnson, Mariana, 127, 134

Johnson, Oliver, 127, 132, 133, 267

Johnson, Sir William, 6, 18

Joly, Professor Nicholas, 342, 350

Jones, Phoebe, 243

June, Jennie, 387

Kelley, William D., 240

Kelley, Abby, 54, 80, 127, 194

Kennan, George, 409

Kent, Chancellor, 7, 221-223

Kergomard, Pauline, 401

Kilpatrick, General, 260, 262

Kimber, Abby, 78, 93

King, Captain Charles, 448

Kingsford, Anna, 377

Kingsley, Canon Charles, 353, 370

Klumpke, Anna, 404

Krapotkine, Prince, 409

Laboulaye, Edouard R.L., 177

LaFayette, Marquis de, 316

Lampson, Father, 130

Lapham, Anson, 181

Lauterbach, Mrs. Edward, 451

Lawrence, Frank E., 417

Lawrence, Margaret Stanton, 324, 325, 377, 378, 418, 420, 432, 450, 451

Lawson, Sir Wilfrid, 365

Leavitt, Joshua, 138, 226

Lecky, W.E.H., 448

Lee, Richard Henry, 312

Lee, Theresa, 443

Lieneff, Mr., 409

Lincoln, Abraham, 210, 403

Livermore, Mary A., 260, 460

Livingston, Colonel James, 3

Livingston, Margaret, 3

Livingston, Mary, 133

Logan, Olive, 260, 374

Long, Governor John D., 330

Longfellow, Henry W., 387, 429, 447

Longfellow, Rev. Samuel, 219

Lord, Dr., 384

Lord, Emily, 406

Lord, Frances, 374, 377, 390-392, 432

Louis Philippe, 96, 97

Lowell, James Russell, 127, 357

Lozier, Dr. Clemence S., 387, 461

Lucas, Margaret Bright, 355, 360, 373-375, 394, 397

Lyon, Mary, 463

McClintock, Elizabeth, 153

McClintock, Mary Ann, 148

McKeon, Judge, 284

McLaren, Charles, 358

McLaren, Mrs. Charles, 358, 359, 394

McLaren, Hon. Duncan, M.P., 354

McLaren, Priscilla Bright, 353, 373-375, 394, 408

McLaren, Walter, 364, 374

McMartin, Donald, 379

McMartin, Duncan, 12, 135

McMartin, Margaret Cady, 11, 12, 48,49, 72, 110, 111

MacDaniel, Eunice, 449

MacDaniel, Frances L., 449

MacDaniel, Osborne, 449

Macaulay, Thomas Babbington, 362

Maire, Rev. Hugh, 72

Mann, Horace, 271

Mann, Prestona, 440

Mansfield, Lord Chief Justice, 425

Mansfield, Mrs. A.A., 282

Marsh, Luther R., 58

Martineau, Harriet, 91, 129, 382, 395

Massey, Gerald, 377

May, Rev. Samuel J., 54, 186, 191, 355

Mellen, Mrs. William, 370

Mendenhall, Dinah, 267

Meredith, George, 432

Michel, Louise, 305

Michelet, Jules, 465

Milinowski, Captain Arthur, 421

Mill, John Stuart, 352, 356, 357, 366, 369,

Mill, Mrs. John Stuart, 150

Miller, Charles Dudley, 54, 55, 202, 203

Miller, Colonel, 88

Miller, Elizabeth Smith, 53, 56, 67, 200-202, 377, 418, 419, 434, 435, 455

Miller, Gerrit Smith, 454

Miller, Jenness, 204

Miller, John B., 67, 68

Miller, Judge, 105

Miller, Justice Samuel F., 317

Minor, Virginia L., 171, 317

Mitchell, Dr. Julia, 394, 408

Mitchell, Dr. Kate, 394, 408

Mitchell, Professor Maria, 157, 463

Moffett, Rev. Dr., 401

Moliner, Professor, 342

Morley, John, 407, 431

Morpeth, Lord, 87

Morris, William, 450

Morrison, Cotton, 395

Morsier, Emilie de, 400

Morton, Edwin, 54, 330

Mott, Lucretia, 54, 78, 80, 82-84, 87, 148,194, 217, 218, 294, 310, 311, 326, 327, 434, 435, 437, 460

Mott, Lydia, 214, 217, 243

Moulton, Louise Chandler, 401

Moulton, Mrs., 263

Müller, Eva, 374

Müller, Henrietta, 374

Murray, Eliza, in, 112

Napoleon, 95,

96, 266, 277

Neal, Elizabeth, 78

Nichol, Elizabeth Pease, 86, 354, 355

O'Connell, Daniel, 89, 90, 103

O'Conor, Charles, 179

Olmstead, Rev. John W., 133

Olmstead, Mary Livingston, 133

Opie, Amelia, 80

Orr, Mrs., 360

Osborne, Eliza W., 434-437

O'Shea, Mrs. Kitty, 422

Owen, Robert Dale, 215, 236, 239, 242

Palmer, Senator John M., 414

Parker, Margaret, 375

Parker, Theodore, 127, 132-134, 150, 263

Parkhurst, Mrs., 429

Parnell, Charles Stewart, 360, 422, 423

Parsons, Chauncey C, 417

Parsons, Mrs. Chauncey C, 417

Patton, Rev. Dr., 382

Peabody, Elizabeth, 127, 132

Pearson, Karl, 409, 430

Pease, Elizabeth, 86, 129

Phelps, Elizabeth B., 173

Phillips, Ann Green, 80

Phillips, Wendell, 54, 58, 89, 129, 131, 150, 169, 180, 189, 213, 214, 218-220, 240, 243, 260, 332, 353

Pierpont, John, 127, 138

Pillsbury, Parker, 127, 257, 355

Plumb, Senator Preston B., 388

Pochin, Mrs.,338

Pomeroy, "Brick," 274, 275

Powell, Aaron, 211, 212

Powell, Professor, 442

Priestman, Annie, 371, 394

Priestman, Mary, 371

Pugh, Sarah, 78, 93, 97, 267, 327

Quincy, Edmund, 131

Ramsey, Mr., 215

Reid, Mrs. Hugo, 80

Remond, Charles, 355

Richer, Léon, 400

Richter, Jean Paul Friedrich, 407

Ripley, George, 134, 449

Ripley, Mrs. George, 449

Richardson, Abby Sage, 226, 439

Ristori, Marchionesse Adelaide, 356

Robinson, Governor Charles, 246-449, 252, 253

Roby, Matilda, 355

Rogers, Caroline Gilkey, 383

Rogers, Nathaniel P., 81, 355

Roland, Mme., 98, 277, 382

Rosa, Mr., 379

Rose, Ernestine L., 150, 189, 191, 217, 218, 243, 366

Root, Elihu, 451

Rouvier, M., 402

Runkle, Mrs., 451

Ruskin, John, 407

Sackett, fudge Gerrit V., 144, 195

Sage, Russell, 449, 450

Sage, Mrs. Russell, 440, 449, 451

Sanborn, Frank, 54, 330, 448

Sanders, Mrs. Henry M., 451

Sargent, Senator Aaron A., 176, 290

Sargent, Mrs. Aaron A., 176

Saville, Mrs., 374, 394

Scatcherd, Alice Cliff, 358, 364, 375, 408, 429

Scatcherd, Mr., 429

Schenck, Elizabeth B., 289

Schenck, Robert C, 243, 244

Scoble, Rev. John, 103, 104

Seaman, Mr., 268

Seidl, Professor, 417

Sewall, May Wright, 323, 420

Sewall, Samuel E., 127

Sewall, Mrs. Samuel E., 127

Seward, Governor William H., 135, 194, 197-199

Seward, Mrs. William H., 195, 197-199

Shaftesbury, Lord, 364

Shaw, Rev. Anna, 420, 461

Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 379, 394, 427

Shelley, Percy Florence, 427

Smalley, George W., 357

Smith, Ann Carroll Fitzhugh, 52, 70

Smith, Elizabeth Oakes, 194

Smith, Gerrit, 51, 52, 54, 60-64, 66, 69, 138, 144, 179, 186, 187, 201, 213, 418, 419, 453-455

Smith, Greene, 454

Smith, Professor Horace, 380

Smith, Mrs. Horace, 379

Smith, Peter Sken, 454

Smith, Sidney, 190

Smith, Sisters, 316

Somerset, Lady Henry, 451, 463

Southwick, Abby, 78

Southwick, Joseph, 127

Southwick. Thankful, 127

Southworth, Louisa, 414, 453

Spaulding, Bishop, 380

Spence, Clara, 327

Spencer, John C, 7

Spencer, Sarah Andrews, 312

Spofford, Jane Snow, 380, 411, 413, 414, 420

Spofford, Mr., 414, 420

Sprague, Governor William, 294

Sta?l, Mme. de, 435

Stanford, Senator Leland, 288, 414

Stanley, Dean, 353, 375

Stansfeld, Mr., M.P., 364

Stanton, Hon. Daniel Cady, 415

Stanton, Edwin M., 403

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady, Granddaughter of author, 344, 428, 429

Stanton, Hon. Gerrit Smith, 164, 325, 416, 417, 448, 451

Stanton, Harriot Eaton, 325, 336, 337, 339, 363, 390-392, 394, 395, 397, 410, 418, 420-422, 429, 431, 451

Stanton, Henry, 163, 417

Stanton, Hon. Henry Brewster, 58, 59, 71, 72, 74, 76, 79, 85, 93, 100, 103, 107, 136, 139, 141, 143, 145, 186, 323, 380, 385

Stanton, Margaret Livingston, 324, 325, 377, 378, 418, 420, 432, 450, 451

Stanton, Marguerite Berry, 331, 428

Stanton, Robert Livingston, 325, 428, 432

Stanton, Theodore, 138, 164, 177, 325, 331, 339, 341, 343, 349, 357, 399, 403, 404, 428, 431, 448, 449, 455

Stead, William T., 422

Stebbins, Catharine F., 144

Stebbins, Giles, 144

Stebbins, Mrs., 282

Steinthal, Rev. Mr., 356

Stepniak, 408

Sterling, Antoinette, 462, 463

Stevens, Thaddeus, 243, 244

Stevenson, Robert Louis, 450

Stewart, Alvin, 58

Stone, Lucy, 194, 203, 243, 245, 294, 460

Stout, Rev. C., 80

Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 264

Straus, Oscar S., 464

Stuart, Charles, 54

Stuart, Dr. Jacob H., 276

Stuart, Mrs. Jacob H., 276

Stuart, Professor, 397

Sturge, Joseph, 82, 367

Sumner, Charles, 138, 239, 240, 242, 403

Sutherland, Duchess of, 87

Swift, Isabella, 64, 66, 67

Swift, Lieutenant, 64

Tanner, Mrs., 364

Taylor, Helen, 366

Taylor, Mrs. Peter A., 368, 374, 394

Terry, Ellen, 464

Thacher, Mayor, 212

Thomson, Adeline, 327

Thomasson, Hon. John P., M. P., 360, 373

Thomasson, Mrs. John P., 373

Thompkins, Governor Daniel D., 7

Thompson, George, 54, 163, 169

Thompson, May Wright, 323

Tilton, Theodore, 6, 184, 260, 267, 401

Train, George Francis, 247, 256, 257

Traut, Mme. Griess, 400

Tree, Ellen, 204

Tudor, Mrs. Fenno, 330

Tyler, Professor, Moses Coit, 303

Tyng, Dr. Stephen, 240

Underhill, Zoe Dana, 448

Van Vechten, Abraham, 7

Vest, Senator George G., 319

Victoria, Queen, 398, 415

Vignon, Claude, 402

Villard, Fanny Garrison, 128

Villard, Henry, 128

Vincent, Henry, 260

Virchow, Professor, 363

Waite, Chief Justice Morrison R., 317

Walter, Ellen Cochrane, 69

Walsingham, Sir Francis, 358

"Warrington," 330

Washington, General George, 3

Weed, Thurlow, 330

Weld, Angelina Grimke, 114

Weld, Theodore D., 114, 240

Wellington, Duke of, 370

Wells, Emeline B., 286

West, Benjamin, 266

Weston, Deborah, 80

Whipple, E.P., 240

Whitney, Anna, 461

Whittier, John G., 127, 138-141, 266, 276

Whittle, Dr. Ewing, 375

Wigham, Eliza, 354

Wigham, Jane, 354

Wilberforce, Canon, 463

Wilberforce, William, 91

Wilbour, Charlotte Beebe, 173, 203, 401

Wilkeson, Catherine Cady, 110, 111

Wilkeson, Samuel, 135

Willard, Amelia, 203, 205, 386

Willard, Emma, 35, 37, 441, 444, 445, 449, 450, 463

Willard, Frances E., 452, 463

Willard, Mrs. John, 443

Williams, Senator C.G., 271

Williams, Elisha, 7

Wilson, Daniel, 402

Winckworth, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen, 362

Winslow, Emily, 64, 78

Woodhull, Victoria, 382

Wollstonecraft, Mary, 382, 427

Woodward, Mr., 273

Worden, Mrs., 195

Wright, David, 435

Wright, Frances, 382

Wright, Henry C., 355

Wright, Martha C., 148, 194, 243, 434, 435, 437

Wright, Mr., 282

Wright, Paulina, 127, 181, 194, 203, 243

Yost, Elizabeth W., 379

Yost, Maria, 9

Zackesewska, Dr. M.E., 243

[Portions of Chapters X. and XI. of this book are taken by permission from an article written by Mrs. Stanton for "Our Famous Women," published by A.D. Worthington & Co.]

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