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   Chapter 30 XXXToC

The Red Watch By J. A. Currie Characters: 18780

Updated: 2017-12-06 00:03


WANTED. MORE AND MORE OF THEM

When General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien came to see me he suggested that I should take a few weeks' rest in England. I objected and said I wanted to be in the big British spring drive in Belgium. He replied that a few days' holidays would not deprive me of that honor, and that he considered the Allies might postpone the offensive until the autumn.

I accepted his suggestion and crossed to England. I met at Bologne an officer of one of the Scottish regiments and he was good enough to get me a pass and a military automobile to take me to La Toquet Hospital, where I renewed old acquaintances with Dr. Shillington, the clever surgeon in charge of the Canadian Hospital there and an old Ottawa friend. When I arrived in London I was notified to attend a medical board at the war office that insisted on giving me three months' sick leave to get my lungs fixed up. I refused to accept more than six weeks.

When I was up in Scotland enjoying a holiday and doing the Loch Lomond country, I received a telegram from Colonel Carson in London telling me that the Minister of Militia would like me to return to Canada for a few months to lecture to the officers in training and assist in recruiting.

In accordance with these instructions I returned to London where I received the following letter from my Brigade Commander, General Turner, V.C.:

Dear Colonel,-Leave has been extended for four days as requested.

The process of reorganizing is a heavy one.

Your battalion will have lost its identity as the 48th Highlanders.

In forwarding recommendation for "Mention in Despatches" it has given me great pleasure including your name for the valuable services rendered at St. Julien.

According to medical officers and my own opinion you are entitled to a good rest or suitable staff employment.

You have done more than called for as a regimental officer.

With best wishes, believe me,

Yours Sincerely,

R.E.W. Turner.

The list of honors for the second battle of Ypres was out and my name had been omitted. I had, however, received notice at the same time that I had been advanced to the rank of full Colonel.

I was pleased, however, to see that Major Marshall, my second in command whom I had recommended for "mention in despatches," had received a D.S.O. He was a professional soldier and this meant much more to him than it did to me. He was later to fall in the front line trenches the victim of a German sniper. A great athlete, a splendid soldier, a universal favorite, Canada and the Empire could ill spare such a man. His solicitude for his men was such that I have known him to give his clothing to some ailing private. He was one of the bravest, truest and kindest of Canadians.

Only a few of the many deserving ones had received recognition, but where there were so many brave men and brave deeds performed it was very difficult to give honors and distinction to all. Officers did no more than the privates, signallers and bombers in the battle. All did their best.

I returned to Canada on board the S.S. Hesperian, which ship had the misfortune to be torpedoed next trip.

In Canada I did my best to stimulate recruiting. The "Red Watch" recruited two more fully-equipped battalions for the war-the 92nd and the 134th.

The story of the brave deeds of the men of 15th Battalion, the Red Watch, after I left Flanders will have to be reserved for a further volume. They covered themselves again with glory at Givenchy, Festubert, Hooge and Sanctuary Wood.

The reader may be inclined to ask the question if through all these troublesome times, the Canadian soldier ever lost faith in ultimate victory and the Empire?

The answer is that we had so many evidences around us of the organizing power of the Empire that it inspired us with faith and confidence. We knew what the navy was doing. The splendid manner in which we were supplied with food and clothing convinced us that the business genius and talent for organization of the Empire would sooner or later overcome lack of preparation and "red tape."

The deeds of our gallant Canadian comrades who fell at St. Julien will always be an inspiration for Canadians in future wars. They have given their lives as hostages for the Empire. They did not die in vain for they have given Canada "a place in the sun." The First Division lost over nine thousand out of about seventeen thousand effectives, at St. Julien.

The men who accomplished this were not "rough-necks" nor swaggering bullies, "muttering strange oaths and bearded like pards." They were good, quiet, clean-living, God-fearing young men, the athletic product of the schools and the Y.M.C.A's. They were typical of the Canadian race. With their red blood they etched the figure of the clean-cut intrepid athletic-fighting Canadian soldier indelibly into the history of this war. It was this noble figure which the officers of the First Canadian Division strove to create. It is this figure that will live in the battle scrolls of Europe.

It is the duty of Canadians always to cherish this tradition as well as to maintain their proper place in the world. It matters not under what system their services are required, if duty calls they should be prepared to arm and go. They will always be wanted where liberty needs defending, yes more and more of them.

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INDEXToC

Note.-In spelling Proper Names, the Daily Telegraph Maps are followed; on the maps in the text, the Belgian spelling is used.

A

Abercrombie, General, 11.

Abeele, 185.

Abraham, Plains of, 13.

Adams, Jane, 73.

Aeroplane, 192, 244, 279.

Africa, South, 19.

Aid, First, 149.

Albert, King of the Belgians, 187.

Alderson, General, 64, 78, 255, 262.

Alexander, Captain, 169, 198, 214, 219, 228, 230, 231, 234, 257.

Amesbury, 90.

Amour, Place d', 195.

Anti-Aircraft guns, 162.

Anti-Militarism, 23.

Archery, Flemish, 162.

"Archibald the Archer," 162.

Armada, Spanish, 60.

Armentieres, 117, 122, 124, 182, 189.

Arnold, General, 15.

Artillery, Canadian, 279.

Aubers, 155, 170, 172, 174.

Aviators, 88, 158, 192, 202.

Avonmouth, 103.

B

Barham's, Ingoldsby Legend, 75.

Barwick, Lt., 40.

Bath, Lt., 240.

Beauvoorde, 184.

Billets, 144.

Bigot, Intendant, 40.

Bisley, 21.

Bixschoote, 189.

Bombing, 179.

Borden, Sir Robert, 30.

Boyle, Lt.-Col., 218, 221.

Brittany, 114.

British troops, 248.

Brooke, Lord, 21, 116.

Burial plots, 186.

Burland, Lt.-Col., 95, 245, 249, 252, 262.

Burstall, Lt.-Col., 74.

C

Caestre, 117, 118, 122.

Calais, Great drive to, 18.

Calder, Sgt., 220, 262.

Camp Fire, 35.

Campbell, Duncan, of Inverawe, 12.

Cameras, (tabooed), 64.

Canada, 11; Capitulation of, 19.

Canadian, Militia, 18, 30; officers, 38;

Northern Ry., 40;

Scottish, 197, 218, 223, 277.

Canadians, reviewed by Roberts, 74; trains of, 184;

wounded, 186;

reviewed by the King, 96.

Cardonnerie, La, 138.

Cassel, City of, 182.

Censoring, 177.

Charteris, Major, 14.

Chateauguay, 19.

Chalk Cliffs, 57.

Clausewitz, 147.

Clergyman, 38.

Cloth square, 186.

Colonial Policy, new, 22; old, 23;

troops, 23;

privateers, 24;

government, 23;

political thought, 23.

Colt, automatic pistol, 49.

Coe, Sgt., 243, 246, 253, 257, 268.

Comet, 55.

Commons, House of, 35.

Competition, signalling, 56.

Connaught, H.R.H. The Duke of, 30, 35, 42, 76, 282.

Contingent, 29, 37.

Cornwallis, Lord, 15.

Cory, Capt., 219, 228, 229, 234, 257.

Cosby, Lt.-Col., 20.

Crozier, General, 43.

Cruisers, British, 52.

Culloden, Battle of, 13.

Culture, German, 147.

Currie, Col. J.A., 20.

Currie, Capt. Victor, 249.

D

Daniel, Capt., 209.

Dansereau, Lt., 20, 113, 118, 176, 181, 197, 214, 219, 220, 231, 236, 253, 246.

Darling, Capt. Clifford, 33, 81, 102, 174, 201.

Davidson, Lt.-Col. J.I., 20.

"Devil Strip," 138.

Diary, Author's, 9.

Diamond, Cape, 46, 48.

"Digging In," 136, 179.

Discipline, 44.

Donaldson, Capt., 107.

Don Station, 39.

Drake, Sir Francis, 58, 60; His Drum, 60;

Island, 60.

Drummond, Lt. Guy, 201, 213, 226.

Dug-outs, 137.

Duguid, Capt., 102, 201, 217, 260, 263, 264.

Du Quesne, Fort, 19; Avenue, 146.

E

Emden, 88.

Enfer Rue d', 159, 172, 167, 179.

"Enfiladed Cross Roads," 249, 268.

Engineers, Canadian, 177.

Entrenching tools, 135.

Equipment, Webb and Oliver, 65.

Estament, French, 164.

Estairs, 175.

Exeter, 66.

F

Fencibles, Glengarry, 16.

Ferland, Pte., 130.

Fessenden, Lieut, 209.

Fire Trenches, 137.

First Aid, 149.

Fisher-Rowe, Col., 133.

Flanders, 117.

Flares, German, 128, 138.

Flax, Mills, 133.

Flemish, 188; Farm, 152;

Horses, 152;

Stock, 152;

Roads, 164.

Fletre, 123.

Flying Corps, Royal, 88.

France, Leaving for, 100; Voyage to, 104;

soldiers of, 110;

unconquerable, 186;

Flying Corps, 197, 211.

Fraser, Hon. Lt.-Col. P.H.D., 20.

French, General Sir John, 116, 126.

"Frightfulness," 146.

Fromelles, 132; Tower destroyed, 160, 165, 174.

Funk Holes, 128.

G

Gas, 214, 215, 216, 237, 240, 241, 273, 280.

Gaspe, 48; transports at, 48, 51.

Geddes, Col., 273.

German, influence, 23; surplus, 163;

prisoners, 173;

gunner

s, 180;

forced requisitions, 164;

snipers, 246;

manner, 250.

Germans declare War, 29.

Ghurkas, 270.

Gibson, Sir John, 39.

Gibson, Lt. Frank, 39, 192, 260, 261.

Glasgow, 88.

Grant, Sgt. Major, 44, 67, 79, 81, 226, 260.

Gravenstafel, 189, 202, 207, 212, 237, 239, 258, 268.

Grubber, Entrenching tools, 135.

H

Haig, General Sir Douglas, 148, 158.

Halifax, 11.

Hamilton, General Sir Ian, 21.

Hawkins, Sgt. G.M., 21.

Hayling Island, 94.

Hazebrouck, 114.

Hendrie, Lt.-Col. Wm., 20.

Hennebeke brook, 213.

Hiex shells, 126.

Highlanders, (42nd Black Watch), 11, 191, 197, 201. (48th Red Watch); Casualties, 13;

volunteers, 30.

trench wars, 242, 233, 234, 225, 241.

Fraser's, (Lovats), 13.

Montgomery's, (Lost Regiment), 15.

Royal Emigrants, 14, 15.

Virginia, 15.

Carolina, 15.

Royal Montreal, 206, 242.

Hill 60, 175, 190, 191, 192, 195, 198.

Hoe, The, 60.

Holt, Lt., 200.

Howitzers, 15 in., 161, 222.

Hughes, Maj. General Sir Sam, 37.

Hughes, Lt.-Colonel G., 201, 215, 217, 261, 264.

Hull, General, 269.

Hurdles, 136.

Hythe Course, 94.

I

Indian Troops, 283.

Ingoldsby Legends, 75.

Iona, 93.

Irving, Capt. T.C., 177.

Islington, Lord, 96.

J

Jago, Capt., 227.

James, Capt., 48, 51.

Jarvis, Lieut. "Bill," 245.

Julien, Battle of, 12 (See St. Julien).

Jones, Lieut. Vernon, 233.

K

Keith, Sgt. Major, 260.

Kerrserlaere, 229, 231, 249.

Kilts, 13.

King, His Majesty George V., Review of Canadians, 79; 2nd do. 96.

King, Major, 229.

Kipling, Rudyard, 86, 165.

Kitchener, Lord, 77, 78, 96; Army, 80, 177.

L

La Bassee, 117, 156.

Lacrosse, 37.

Lancaster, Lt., 174.

Langmuir, Lt., 204, 210, 240.

Langemarck, 189.

Lauder, Sir Thomas Stair Dick, 12.

Laurier, Sir Wilfrid, 30.

Lawrence, Sir Joseph, 80.

Leckie, Col., 199, 221, 275, 277.

Levison-Gower, Col., 124.

Liege, Siege of, 30.

Lille, 156.

Listening Posts, 159.

Lightfoot, Major, 221.

Liquor, French regulations, 72.

Loire, River, 110.

London, 91.

Long Branch, 31, 32, 34, 38.

Loretto Falls, 40.

Longsword, Wm., 60.

Louisburg, 11, 13.

Loomis, Lt.-Col., 230.

Lundy's Lane, 15.

M

Marne, The, 109.

Marshall, Major, 20, 66, 67, 104, 107, 108, 122, 125, 191, 197, 200, 205, 214, 231, 235, 243, 247, 250, 253, 257, 258, 262, 271, 287.

Mavor, Lieut., 211, 239.

Medland, 245.

Megantic, S.S., 44.

Meighen, 138, 166, 199, 202.

Mercer, General, 74.

Meuse, crossings of, 29.

Miller, Sgt., 219, 277.

Mobilization of Militia, 32.

Moffatt, Capt. Rev., 99.

Monroe, Doctrine, 22.

Montcalm, 12.

Montreal, Royal Rgt. of, 16, 197, 219.

Moore, Sir John, 33.

Morden, Lt.-Col., Grant, 76.

Mount Pleasant Park, 11.

Moussey's Corps, 190.

Mowat, Sir Oliver, 20.

Muir, Lieut. A., 274.

Mull, Island of, 92.

Musgrove, Capt., 274, 275.

Mc and MAC

McBride, Sir Richard, 78.

Macdonald, Capt. Harold, 261.

MacDonald, Lieut. Fred, 193, 240.

MacDonald, Sir John A., 20.

MacDonald, Col., 20.

MacDougall, Major, 205.

McGregor, Capt. Archie, 138, 144, 163, 169, 195, 198, 204, 239, 240.

McHarg, Col. Hart, 218, 232.

MacKenzie, Major, 66, 144, 175, 197, 247, 260.

MacKenzie, Dr., 128, 193.

McKessock, Capt., 168, 209, 240.

McLaren, Capt., 108, 193, 198, 199, 222, 239, 242.

N

Napoleon, 181, 272.

National Service, 9.

Neuve Chapelle, 155, 165; battle of, 178.

Newfoundland, 52.

Norsworthy, Major, 226.

O

Odlum, Major, 233, 249.

Ordnance, Canadian, 107.

Orange, Wm. of, 66.

Ormond, Major, 233, 252.

Osborne, Capt., 169, 198, 206, 208, 228, 233, 240.

P

Palliasses, 11.

Parker, Sir Gilbert, 40.

Patney, Station, 66.

Patrolling, 131, 149.

Perley, Sir George, 77, 96.

Pettion, Rue, 159.

Perth, 14.

Pitt, 13, 25.

Plumer, General, 262, 281.

Plymouth, 63.

Poelcapelle, 206, 219, 250.

Pownall, Governor, 24.

Poperinghe, 105.

Princess Pats, C.L.I., 101, 169.

Pultney, General, 119, 123.

Pyke, Corp., 266, 268, 278.

Pyramids, 70.

Q

Quebec, Embarkation at, 46; Tercentennial, 46, 47.

R

Rationing in Trenches, 144.

Rations, Iron, 144.

Radcliffe, Coy. Sgt. Major, 33, 63.

Rawlinson, General, 161.

Rifle, Ross, 142, 231.

Roberts, Lord, 72, 73, 75, 77, 78, 80.

Robinson, John Ross, 90.

Rouen, 63.

Roulers, 207.

Routine in Trenches, 144.

Ryerson, Lt., 157, 174.

Ryerson, Capt. George, 226.

S

Salisbury Plains, 69, 82.

Sap, 150; Sapper, 150.

Sarum, 70.

Scheldt, River, 156.

Scott, Canon, 43, 120, 159, 166, 191.

Scott, H. Maxwell, 239.

Scottish Heather, 11.

Seely, Col., M.P., 98.

Service, National, 147.

Shells, stray, 173.

Sherwood Foresters, 124.

Shoenberger, Lieut., 236, 237.

Sinclair, Lt. Alex., 33, 195.

Sing Song, Long Branch, 38; Abeele, 185.

Smith-Dorrien, General Sir Horace, 116, 123, 182, 183, 282, 286.

Smith, Lieut., 209, 240.

Snipers, 148, 163.

Snow, General, 264, 265.

Soudan, 19.

Standing Orders, tradition, 33, 34.

Stand to, 140.

St. Eloi, 189.

Stevenson, Robt. Louis, 12.

St. Lawrence trip down, 48.

St. Julien, 16, 189, 190, 193, 194, 198, 199, 202, 203, 211, 216, 217, 219, 231, 232, 235, 238, 240, 244, 245, 247, 262.

St. Muir Bac., 133.

St. Nazaire, 109.

Stonehouse, 63.

Stonehenge, 69, 70, 96.

Strombeek, 206.

Sweeny, Major, 34.

Sylvester, Rev. Father, 131.

T

Tavistock, 60.

Tam-O-Shanters, 143.

Taylor, Lieut., 199, 210, 211, 239.

Taylor, Rev. Bishop, 75.

Tipperary, 64.

Ticonderoga, 19.

Toronto Regiment, 214, 235, 245.

Trenches, 124; Consolidating, 136;

description of, 136;

Routine, 140;

rationing, 141;

meals in, 141;

Orders, 149;

Telephones, 160;

Belgium in, 186;

Divisional reserve, 253.

Turner, General, V.C., 95, 180, 202, 215, 217, 221, 225, 261, 262, 263, 264, 269, 287.

Turgot, 22.

Turcos, march, 214, 215, 216, 218, 219, 220, 226.

V

Valcartier Camp, 26.

Venner, Sgt., 266.

W

War, Seven Years, 23.

War, The Greatest, 13.

Warren, Capt. Trumbull, 33, 67, 193, 176, 201.

Watch Black, 11, 18.

Watch, Red, (48th Highlanders), casualties, 12, 16, 32, 263, 287.

Webb equipment, 65.

Westminster Abbey, 90.

Williams, Col. Victor, 42.

Williams-Taylor, Lieut., 150, 151.

Winnipeg Batt. (90th), 206.

Wolfe's Victory, 13, 40.

Wood, Col. Burchall, 106.

Wright, Major, 177, 211.

Y

Ypres, 85, 117, 177; Cloth Hall, 187;

Irish Convent, 187;

Salient of, 189;

Shelling of, 193, 212, 218, 235, 236, 258, 259, 260, 263, 271, 276.

Yperlee Canal, 189, 214, 269.

Y.M.C.A., 37, 53.

Z

Zillebeke, 190.

Zonnebeke, 189, 203, 245, 249.

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Typographical errors corrected in text:

Page 28: Caesar replaced with C?sar

Page 38: Pacificism replaced with Pacifism

Page 77: "tribute to the Canadians troops that had served him in South Africa." replaced with "tribute to the Canadian troops that had served him in South Africa."

Page 79: gacious replaced with gracious

Page 81: Sergeat-Major replaced with Sergeant-Major

Page 91: "feed him till he almost fainted" replaced with "fed him till he almost fainted"

Page 94: quad leaders replaced with squad leaders

Page 115: seventeeth replaced with seventeenth

Page 137: trenchs replaced with trenches

Page 183: offiers replaced with officers

Page 183: and and replaced with and

Page 184: C?stre replaced with Caestre (2 times)

Page 245: Zoonebec replaced with Zonnebeke

Page 205: "There efficacy is in their recoil" replaced with "Their efficacy is in their recoil"

Page 233: thir replaced with their

Page 238: specically replaced with specifically

Page 239: bondoliers replaced with bandoliers

Page 240: asyphyxiating replaced with asphyxiating

Page 241: Chorline replaced with Chlorine

Page 245: Zonnebec replaced with Zonnebeke

Page 249: Zonnebec replaced with Zonnebeke

Page 261: "He later lost his lift at Givenchy." replaced with "He later lost his life at Givenchy."

Page 261: Scrimiger replaced with Scrimger

Page 268: Hennebec replaced with Hennebeke

Page 268: Zonnebec replaced with Zonnebeke

Page 276: fyle replaced with file

Page 278: "for me the hear it" replaced with "for me to hear it"

Page 279: sox replaced with socks

Page 285: catagories replaced with categories

Page 287: Yous replaced with Yours

Page 287: musfortune replaced with misfortune

Page 287: "recruited two more fully-equipped battalions for the wear" replaced with "recruited two more fully-equipped battalions for the war"

Page 289: Intendent replaced with Intendant

Page 289: Cardonniere replaced with Cardonnerie

Page 289: Cassells replaced with Cassel

Page 291: Basse replaced with Bassee

Page 293: Sweeny replaced with Sweny

Page 294: Birchall replaced with Burchall

Notes on unusual words:

Page 159: Nervli were the people of Hainault and Cambresis in Gaul. Referenced in Plutarch's Lives.

Page 216: liquified spelled as in image.

Page 250: A sap is a narrow trench, normally for communication, made by digging at an angle from the existing trench.

Page 289: "Northern Ry." refers to "Northern Railway"

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