MoboReader> Literature > Verdi: Man and Musician

   Chapter 12 VERDI LITERATURE

Verdi: Man and Musician By Frederick James Crowest Characters: 35156

Updated: 2017-12-06 00:03


Its scantiness-Restricted scope for the writer and historian-English ideas of Italian opera-English books on Verdi-German historians' measure-Recent English press notices-Foreign journalistic criticism-Italian writings.

The Verdi bibliography, particularly that in English, is not extensive, a result doubtless arising from the fact that the master has confined himself solely to one branch of the composer's art, namely, opera. Although, therefore, the composer of Il Trovatore has enjoyed a much wider popularity than other masters who might be named, and about whom volumes have been and will be written, the confined nature of Verdi's musical circuit has rendered him relatively much less attractive to the musical critic, historian, and biographer. This is the penalty, perhaps, which has to be paid by musicians who find themselves unable, or unwilling, to spend laborious days and nights in the conception and composition of profound orchestral creations of the symphony and concert-overture type, which, however admirable in the eyes and ears of those who listen to, analyse, and criticise them, have rarely proved profitable to those who composed them, save and beyond the posthumous honour which they may win for their wondrous workers. Notwithstanding the universal popularity which Verdi has enjoyed for fifty years, there is, from the one-sided nature of his work, the possibility of under-estimating his real worth as a master of music. With the tendency among all ranks of art-workers to endeavour to shine in many parts, it is quite exceptional to find one content to do his best, and succeed, with one phase of his art, as Verdi has done.

Italian opera was first brought into England in 1706, when Arsin?e was produced at Drury Lane Theatre, and in order to give those who attended performances of it a chance of understanding it, it was rendered with English words! Yet the article has never wholly commended itself to the English people, who, especially in its early history here, were unable to enter into the spirit of the bombastic, exaggerated plots, and excessive love scenes. Thus it does not, and will not, command equal interest among reasoning musicians, compared particularly with that attaching to symphony or oratorio. Italian opera might well disappear from the face of the earth, so far as English people are concerned; but a similar remark could not be applied to any new oratorio or symphony. Opera seria is not in vogue here, not even a national English opera, and Italian opera is just kept from collapse by another class than that which rushes with delight to performances of operas of H.M.S. Pinafore and The Grand Duke type. Consequent upon all this, critics have gone on chronicling and criticising Verdi's operatic successes (especially in his later operas) and failures, pausing but little to gauge any relative musical worth of the man as compared with other great masters. It is, of course, not possible for such a prolific indefatigable worker as Verdi was to go on occupying the world musically, if only in one direction, without exercising some sway over the minds and dispositions of listeners. It is the bearing of Verdi's operatic efforts upon art that has been neglected by the English press especially. The fact of Verdi having been so little amongst us affords, naturally, another explanation for the comparatively scant literature respecting both him and his works. Until the appearance of the present monograph, no work existed that brought the life and work of the famous Italian master up to date, or that attempted to place him critically and musically among the great exponents of his art. To that extent, at least, Verdi literature was wanting.

But to deal with the bibliography that does exist. Perhaps the best work in English is Pougin's Anecdotic History of Verdi; his Life and Works, which has been excellently translated from the French by James E. Matthew (1887). Another interesting book in our language concerning Verdi is Blanche Roosevelt's Verdi: Milan and "Otello" (1887), which is a short life of the master, with letters written about Milan and the opera Otello. The brief article by Signor Gianandrea Mazzucato (in Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians) on Verdi is a valuable contribution to the subject, and is probably the best account of the maestro contained in any dictionary. The last work it treats of, however, is A?da, and although it touches Otello somewhat prophetically, it is necessarily silent about that greater work Falstaff.

Ritter, in his History of Music (1876), disposes of Verdi in less than eleven short lines; but a little more justice, in the way of space, is done to the famous Italian by Naumann in his large, comprehensive History of Music, since he devotes to Verdi nearly two whole pages out of over thirteen hundred!

Masters of Italian Music (R.A. Streatfeild), contains an appreciative biography of Verdi, based upon Pougin's work, together with some sound criticism upon Italian opera in general, and Verdi's in particular. A further work in the English language referring to Verdi is Elson's Realm of Music, chap. xviii. of which deals with the "Evolution of Verdi"; while in Ferris's Lives of the Celebrated Composers there is an intelligent comparison between the Otello of Verdi and Rossini. Dr. Parry's Studies of the Great Composers omits Verdi altogether, the reason for which does not appear.

French works bearing upon Verdi are-Bertrand (Gustave), Les nationalités musicales, étudiées dans le drame lyrique ..., Verdisme et Wagnerisme; Fouque (Octave), Histoire du Théatre Ventadour (1829-79),-Opéra Comique,-Théatre de la Renaissance,-Théatre Italien, Verdi; Maurel (Victor), à propos de la mise-en-scène du drame lyrique "Otello," being étude précédée d'aper?us sur le théatre chanté en 1887; Noufflard (Georges), "Otello" de Verdi et le drame lyrique.

The above enumerated writings, and the criticisms which have appeared more or less regularly in the Athen?um, Times, and Illustrated London News, constitute the chief of what has been published in the English and French languages relating to Verdi. We should not omit to state, however, that lately, especially since the production of Falstaff, not a little has been said, if not written, of the illustrious Verdi and his works. Sir A.C. Mackenzie's lectures on Falstaff were particularly interesting. Therein the talented Principal of the Royal Academy of Music paid a high tribute to the personal qualities of the doyen of composers. In tracing the gradual development of Verdi's genius Sir A.C. Mackenzie asserted that the composer did not show any Wagnerian influence in his later works-a judgment with which competent judges will agree. The articles which Dr. Villiers Stanford contributed to the Daily Graphic concerning Falstaff, its wonderful humorous music, and the man who made it, were worthy of the journal and its talented special correspondent; while Mr. Joseph Bennett's tried and trusty pen has also been descried in more than one masterly article concerning Verdi in the Daily Telegraph and Musical Times. In the Musical Recollections of Mr. Wilhelm Kuhe, entrepreneur and raconteur, are numerous critical passages and remarks concerning Verdi and several of his operas.

Foreign journalism has always been busy about Verdi. Thus such publications of his native land as La Perseveranza, the Supplemento Straordinario of the Gazzetta Musicale,[83] La Scena, La Fanfulla, and Il Pensiero di Nizza, with the Spanish journal, Cronica di la Musica, abound in criticisms and notes respecting the master. Much excellent critical matter relating to Verdi and his works will be found, too, in the French journals, Le Ménestrel, La Nazione, La France Musicale, Journal des Debats, and Figaro; while he has been far from neglected by the German press, in such papers as the Neue Berliner Musik Zeitung, and others.

The most important and valuable writings respecting Verdi, however, are, as might be expected, in the Italian language. Among these are-

Sketches of the Life and Works of Giuseppe Verdi (Bermani), 1846; Studies upon the Operas of Giuseppe Verdi (Basevi), 1859; Biographical Notes on Giuseppe Verdi, followed by brief analyses of "A?da" and the "Requiem Mass" (Perosio), 1875; Critical Musical Essay on "A?da" (Pe?a y Go?i), 1875; Considerations on the actual State of Musical Art in Italy, and the artistic Importance of "A?da" and the "Requiem Mass" (Sassaroli), 1876; Verdi and his Operas (Monaldi), 1877.

[83] 27th November 1889.

* * *

INDEX

Adam, Adolphe, on Ernani, 69.

A?da, and Wagner, 46, 82;

167;

genesis of, 168;

produced at Cairo, 169;

an admitted masterpiece in Milan, Paris, and England, 170;

Athen?um on, 173-176, 197;

first performance, 211;

place of, 237, 238, 239;

Verdi's view in composing, 241;

orchestration of, 242;

peculiarly Verdinian, 245-247;

249, 250, 251, 286.

---- and operatic development, 284, 286;

---- a masterpiece, 291.

Albani, 235.

Albert Hall, Verdi's Requiem at, 154.

Alboni, Mme., in Luisa Miller, 97, 98, 99.

---- and Trovatore, 118 n.

Alceste, Gluck's, 278.

Alzira produced at Naples, 76, 81, 96.

Anato at the Lyceum, 47.

Angelini, Signor, in Forza del Destino, 148.

Anti-Verdians and Verdians, 57;

and Verdi's music, 131.

Argentine Theatre, Rome, Due Foscari at, 74.

Arimondi, Signor, in Falstaff, 191, 194.

Armandi, Signor, in Falstaff, 191, 194.

Aroldo, 76.

Athen?um, musical critic of, 44;

on Ernani, 67-69;

on Attila, 79;

on Masnadieri, 90;

on Luisa Miller, 100;

on Rigoletto, 108;

on Trovatore, 122;

and La Traviata, 135, 142;

on A?da, 173, 180;

on Otello, 180;

on Falstaff, 196-200;

and Traviata, 236;

and A?da, 243;

and Nabucco, 244;

256, 265, 290, 291, 298.

Attila, produced at the Fenice, 76;

well received, 77;

in London, 78;

opinions on, 79-82;

political influence of, 206.

Auber, 124.

---- Gustave III., 145, 146, 163, 259, 281.

Ave Maria, Verdi's, 162.

Bach, 226.

Bach's oratorii, 159.

Bagasset, violinist, 9.

Baistrocchi, organist, 14.

Balderi, Signor, in Trovatore, 115.

Balfe, M.W., succeeds Costa at Her Majesty's, 93.

Ballo in Maschera, Un, 144;

produced at Rome, 145;

at the Lyceum, 145;

opinion on, 145-148.

---- place of, 237.

Barbieri-Nini in Macbeth, 83.

Barbot, Mme., in Forza del Destino, 148.

Barezzi, Antonio, grocer, 5, 17, 21;

helps Verdi to Milan, 23, 26;

his eldest daughter, 27.

Basevi, critic, on Verdi, 207.

---- on La Traviata, 234, 300.

Basili, Francesco, and Verdi's rejection by the Milan

Conservatoire, 24.

Battaglia di Legnano, La, produced at Rome, 93, 207.

Baucarde, Signor, in Trovatore, 115.

Beethoven mass, 159, 226, 232.

Beletti, in Attila, 79.

Bellini, 54, 82, 105, 122, 226, 227, 229, 241;

and the growth of opera, 279.

Beneventano, in Luisa Miller, 99.

---- in La Traviata, 132.

Bennett, Mr. Joseph, 299.

---- Sterndale, 163.

Berlin, Falstaff in, 196.

Berlioz, 243.

Bermani, 300.

Bertoni, 214.

Bertrand's, Gustave, Verdisme et Wagnerisme, 298.

Bey, Mariette, and A?da, 168.

Bibliography (Verdi), 293-300.

Birth of Verdi, 1.

Birthplace of Verdi, 3.

Boito and Simon Boccanegra, 143.

---- and libretto of Otello, 178.

---- and Otello, 184;

and Falstaff, 187, 188, 190, 287.

Bonnehée, M. in Vêpres Siciliennes, 140.

Borio, Mme. Rita, in Ernani, 63.

Bosio, in Luisa Miller, 103;

in Rigoletto, 107.

Botelli, Signor, in Ernani, 63.

Bottesini, conductor in A?da, 169.

Bouche, in Masnadieri, 84.

Boulo, M., in Vêpres Siciliennes, 140.

Brigands, Les, 92 (see Masnadieri).

Bülow, Dr. von, and Verdi's Requiem, 153, 156.

Buononcini and the growth of opera, 277.

Busseto Hospital and Verdi, 216.

Cairo, Italian theatre at, 168.

Caldara and the growth of opera, 277.

Caldara's church music, 161.

Calzolari, Signor, in La Traviata, 132.

Cammerano, M., 94, 113.

Campana, Fabio, 234.

Capecelatro, Verdi's evil genius, 96.

Capponi, Signor, and Verdi's Requiem 153.

---- in A?da, 172.

Carducci and Verdi, 215.

Casimir-Perier and Verdi, 210.

Castelli, in Luisa Miller, 99.

Cataneo, Signora, in Otello, 180.

Cavaletti, Stephen, 13.

Cavour and Verdi, 208.

Cerito, 290.

Certificate of Verdi's birth, 3.

Chorley, H.F., 44;

on Nabucco, 45;

on Luisa Miller, 102;

La Traviata, 138;

176, 255, 263, 265, 266, 270.

Church music, 158.

Cocle, M.C. du, and A?da, 168.

Coletti, Signor, in Due Foscari, 74;

in Masnadieri, 84.

Coquelin, the elder, 187.

Corbari, Mlle., in Nabucco, 41.

Corsaro, Il, produced at Trieste, 93.

Corsi, in Nino, 47.

Cortesi, 287.

Costa, Signor, 92;

in A?da, 169.

---- Sir Michael and Verdi's cantata, 164.

Coulon, M., in Vêpres Siciliennes, 140.

Critics, musical, 256, 270.

Cruvelli, Sophie, in Attila, 78;

in Luisa Miller, 103.

---- and Les Vêpres Siciliennes, 139, 141.

Cuzzani, in Attila, 79.

Dafne, the first opera, 275.

Daily Graphic and Falstaff, 189-191, 299.

Daily Telegraph, 299.

Danton's bust of Verdi, 211.

Davison, J.W., 44, 270.

Debassini, Signor, in Forza del Destino, 148.

Decazes, Duke, and Verdi, 210.

Dejeau, Julienne, in Ballo in Maschera, 145.

Delair, Paul, 187.

Delna, Mlle., and Falstaff, 194.

Derivis, in I Lombardi, 55.

Development of Verdi, 228-255.

Didiée, Mlle., in Rigoletto, 107.

Don Carlos, place of, 237;

its models, 282.

Donatelli, Signora, in La Traviata, 128.

Donizetti and Nabucco, 38, 49, 54, 65, 68, 82, 105, 122, 136,

226, 227, 229, 241, 267;

and the growth of opera, 279, 282.

Dramatis person? of I Lombardi, 51.

Drury Lane, Arsin?e at, 294.

Due Foscari, 70;

produced at Rome, Paris, and London, 74, 108, 109;

place in Verdi's development, 229.

Dumas's Dame aux Camelias and La Traviata, 126, 135.

Elson's Realm of Music, 297.

England, Italian opera first introduced into, 294.

English, indifference of the, to Italian opera, 295.

Ernani, 39, 45, 46;

produced, 58;

in England, 60-69, 108, 146, 147, 197;

political influence of, 206.

Euridice, second opera, 276.

Exhibition of 1862 and Verdi's cantata, 163.

Faccio, conductor in Otello, 178, 287.

Fagotti, Signor, in Vêpres Siciliennes, 140.

Falstaff, 82, 168;

produced at La Scala, 187, 189;

and Wagner's Der Meistersinger, 189, 199;

in Paris, 193;

in London, 194;

most "taking" pieces in, 195;

music in, 196;

score of, 200;

a rehearsal at Milan, 213;

place in Verdi's development, 239, 241, 249, 250-255;

and operatic development, 286;

a masterpiece, 291;

lectures on, 298.

Faust, Gounod's, 90.

Feitlinger, M., in A?da, 172.

Fenice Theatre, Ernani at, 58;

Rigoletto at, 105, 106.

Ferris's Lives of the Celebrated Composers, 297.

Festa, music master, 273.

Filippi, critic, 221.

Finto Stanislas, Il, 103.

Foreign journals and Verdi, 299.

Fornasara, Signor, in Nabucco, 41;

in I Lombardi, 56;

in Ernani, 63;

in Otello, 179.

Forza del Destino, produced at St. Petersburg, Milan,

and Paris, 148;

shows Verdi's Third style, 149;

place of, 237.

Foscari, Francisco, 70.

Fouque's, Octave, Histoire du Théatre, 298.

Franco-German opera in England, 264.

Fraschini, Signor, in Due Foscari, 75;

in Ballo in Maschera, 145.

French President and Verdi, 210.

Frezzolini, Erminia, in I Lombardi, 55;

in Giovanna d'Arco, 75.

Fugue, Germans indebted to Italians for, 161.

Garbon, Signor, in Falstaff, 191.

Garden, Verdi's, 220.

Gardoni, in I Lombardi, 55;

in Attila, 79

in Masnadieri, 84, 86, 88, 91;

in Luisa Miller, 101.

Gasparini and the growth of opera, 277.

Gazette Musicale, 231.

Gazzaniga, Mme., in Luisa Miller, 96.

German opera in England, 263.

Germans indebted to Italians for the fugue, 161.

Ghislanzoni and A?da, 168.

Gindale, Ernestina, in A?da, 172.

Giovanna d'Arco, at La Scala, 75.

Giovanna di Guzman, 140.

Giraldoni, Signor, in Ballo in Maschera, 145.

Giuglini, Signor, in Luisa Miller, 98, 99;

in Verdi's cantata, 164.

Globe, The, on Verdi, 219.

Gluck and Piccini feud, 57-60.

---- and the growth of opera, 278.

Goggi, Signora, in Trovatore, 115.

Go?i, Pe?a y, 300.

Gordigiani, Luigi, 234.

Gounod, 90.

Graphic, Daily, 38.

Graziani, Signor, in Trovatore and Ernani, 119, 124;

in La Traviata, 128;

in Forza del Destino, 148;

in A?da, 172.

Grisi, in I Lombardi, 56;

in Due Foscari, 74; 290.

Grossi, Signor, in Trovatore, 115.

---- Mme., in A?da, 169.

Grove's Dictionary of Music, 297.

Guasco, Signor, in I Lombardi, 55;

in Ernani, 59.

Guerrini, Virginia, in Falstaff, 191.

Gueymard, M., in Vêpres Siciliennes, 140.

Guicciardi, Signor, in Trovatore, 115.

Gustave III., 144 (see Ballo in Maschera).

Guttierez and Trovatore, 113.

Gye, Mr., produces Anato at the Lyceum, 47;

produces Rigoletto, 107.

Halévy, 281.

Handel's oratorii, 159.

Haydn, 226.

---- mass, 159.

Her Majesty's Theatre, Nabucco at, 39;

I Lombardi at, 56;

Ernani at, 60;

Due Foscari at, 74;

Attila at, 78;

Masnadieri at, 84;

La Traviata at, 129, 291;

Verdi's cantata at, 164.

Hugo, Victor, 105.

Hullah and musical education, 121.

Humbert, King, congratulates Verdi, 192

.

Illustrated London News, 44;

on Ernani, 63-67;

on Atilla, 79;

on Masnadieri, 88;

on Rigoletto, 107, 108;

on Trovatore, 124;

on Traviata, 132;

and Vêpres Siciliennes, 141;

and Simon Boccanegra, 143;

on Verdi's cantata, 164;

258, 268, 289, 298.

Inno delle Nazioni cantata, 163.

Italian and Teuton in instrumental music, 165.

---- church music, 158.

---- opera, introduction of, to England, 294.

---- school of music, 273.

Italians and music, 8.

Jacovacci and Un Ballo in Maschera, 144.

Jerusalem, 58 (see Lombardi).

Jerusalemme, 58 (see Lombardi).

Joan of Arc, 76 (see Giovanna d'Arco).

Jommelli and the growth of opera, 277.

Journals, foreign, and Verdi, 299.

Khedive of Egypt and Verdi, 168, 169, 209.

Kitzu, Signora, in Falstaff, 194.

Kuhe's, Wilhelm, Musical Recollections, 299.

Lablache, Signor, in Masnadieri, 84, 86, 88.

La Scala Theatre, 25, 30, 34, 35;

direction of, choose Verdi to compose the opera d'obbligo, 50;

Giovanna d'Arco at, 75;

Forza del Destino at, 148;

Verdi's Requiem at, 154;

A?da in, 170;

Montezuma in, 177;

Otello in, 178;

Falstaff at, 187, 192.

Lasina, agreement with Verdi, 105.

Lavigna, Vincenzo, 25.

Libretto of Nabucco, 42;

of Luisa Miller, 94, 98;

of I Due Foscari, 70;

of Rigoletto, 105;

of Forza del Destino, 148;

of A?da, 170-172.

Lind, Jenny, 75;

in Masnadieri, 84, 86, 87, 88, 91.

Loewe, Signora, in Ernani, 59.

Lombardi, 45, 46;

dramatis person? of, etc., 51;

produced at the Milan Theatre, 54;

compared with Nabucco, 56;

produced in Paris, 58;

197, 204;

political influence of, 206.

London, A?da in, 170;

Otello in, 180, 182;

Falstaff in, 194, 196.

Lord Chamberlain and La Traviata, 133, 136.

Lorredano, James, 71.

---- Peter, 70.

Lotti, the growth of opera, 277.

Lotti's church music, 161.

Lucca and Verdi, 92;

purchases Il Corsaro, 93.

Luisa Miller, libretto of, 94;

produced at Naples, London, and Paris, 96;

opinions on, 96, 99-99-103;

at Her Majesty's, 97;

at the Théatre Italien, Paris, 103;

place in Verdi's development, 229, 230.

Lumley, Mr., on Nabucco, 40;

revives Nino, 46;

produces I Lombardi, 56;

on Ernani, 60;

on Due Foscari, 74;

produces Attila, 78;

produces Masnadieri, 84;

his faith in Verdi, 92;

on Luisa Miller, 97;

on La Traviata, 129-129-135;

264.

Macbeth, 81;

produced at Florence, Milan, and Venice, 83;

at Florence, 211.

Mackenzie's, Sir A.C., lectures on Falstaff, 298.

Maini, Signor, and Verdi's Requiem, 153.

Maledizione, La, 105 (see Rigoletto).

Malibran, 68.

Mancinelli, Signor, in Falstaff, 194.

Manzoni and the Rossini mass, 152, 212.

Mapleson and La Traviata, 291.

Marcello's church music, 161.

Marchetti, 287.

Margarita, 27.

Marimon, Mlle., in Masnadieri, 92.

Marini, Mme., and Oberto, 31.

Mario, Signor, in I Lombardi, 56;

in Due Foscari, 74;

in Rigoletto, 107;

in Falstaff, 192.

Mascagni, 287.

Masini, Signor, and Verdi's Requiem, 154.

Masnadieri, 81;

written for England, 84;

at Her Majesty's, 84-86;

story of, 86;

a failure, 88, 92;

opinions on, 88-91.

Mass, Verdi's Requiem, 151-161.

Matthew, J.E., 297.

Maurel, M., in Otello, 179, 180;

in Falstaff, 187, 191, 194;

à propos de la mise-en-scène du drame lyrique

"Otello," 298.

Mazzucato, Signor, and the Rossini mass, 152.

---- Gianandrea, 297.

Medini, Signor, and Verdi's Requiem, 154;

in A?da, 169.

Melody in music, 274.

Mendelssohn and Verdi's Requiem, 157;

his oratorii, 159;

266.

Mercadante, 49, 68;

jealous of Verdi, 116;

227, 267.

Merelli, Bartolomeo, and Oberto, 30;

engages Verdi to write three operas, 32;

tears Verdi's agreement up, 34;

produces Nabucco, 35, 38;

his generosity, 39;

agreement with Verdi for the opera d'obbligo, 50.

Messe Solennelle, Rossini's, and Verdi's Requiem mass,

158.

Meyerbeer, 124, 163, 239, 245, 259, 263, 264, 267, 281, 284, 285.

Milan, excitement in, over Otello, 177;

Falstaff in, 196, 198.

---- Conservatoire, 23.

---- Philharmonic Society, Verdi conductor of, 30.

Milanese, and the production of I Lombardi, 54.

Mirate, in Rigoletto, 106.

Mireille, Gounod's, 90.

Missa da Requiem, Verdi's, 152.

Monaldi, 300.

Monday Popular Concerts, Verdi at, 162.

Mongini, Signor, in Vêpres Siciliennes, 140;

in A?da, 169.

"Monte de Pieta" of Busseto, 23, 26.

Montenegro, Mme., in Due Foscari, 75.

Monteverde and the growth of opera, 276, 280.

Montezuma given at La Scala, 177.

Moriani, in Ernani, 63.

Mozart and Verdi's Requiem, 157;

mass, 159;

200, 202, 226, 252, 253.

Music, characteristics of Verdi's, 7;

in Nabucco, 38, 42, 54;

in Trovatore, 115, 262;

of La Traviata, 137;

in Falstaff, 196, 252;

in A?da, 242;

in Otello, 248;

Italian school of, 273.

Musical Times, 299.

Muzio, letter from Verdi to, 128;

168.

Nabucco, produced at La Scala, 35;

its success, 36, 38;

in rehearsal of, 37;

purchased by Ricordi, 39;

in London, 39-41;

146, 147;

libretto of, 42;

English opinions of, 40-47;

musical points in, 48;

compared with I Lombardi, 56;

with Rigoletto, 108, 109;

political influence of, 206.

Nabucodonosor, 37.

Naumann's History of Music, 297.

Nautier-Didiée, Mme., in Forza del Destino, 148.

"Nebuchadnezzar," 34.

Ney, Jenny, in Trovatore, 118, 120.

Nicolini, Signor, in A?da, 172.

Nilsson, 235.

Nino, Re d'Assyria, 40 (see Nabucco).

Noufflard's, George, "Otello" de Verdi, 298.

Oberto, conte di S. Bonifacio, 28;

produced in La Scala Theatre, 31;

sold to Ricordi, 32.

Obin, M., in Vêpres Siciliennes, 140.

Olghina, Olga, in Falstaff, 194.

"Omnibus" box, the, 288.

Opera during the past three-quarters of the century, 224;

decline of, 289;

origin and development of, 273;

the first, 275;

the second, 276;

growth of, 275-279.

Opera d'obbligo, Verdi chosen to compose, 50.

Opera-house, vitality of the, 288.

Orchestra in the first opera, 275;

in Orfeo, 277.

Orchestration in A?da, 284.

Orfeo, Monteverde's, 276.

---- Gluck's, 278.

Organist of Roncole, Verdi becomes, 20.

Otello, 82, 168;

produced at Milan, 178;

in London, 180, 182;

orchestration in, 185, 197;

in Paris, 210;

place in Verdi's development, 233, 239, 241, 247-250, 251, 286;

and operatic development, 285;

a masterpiece, 291.

Otellopolis, 177.

Otello-Verdi mania, 179.

Pacini, 49.

Palazzo Doria, 219.

Palestrina, 274.

Palestrina's church music, 161.

Palma, in Macbeth, 83, 207.

Pantaleoni, Romilda, Signora, in Otello, 179.

Paris, scenes and costumes for A?da from, 168;

A?da produced in, 170;

Otello at, 182;

Falstaff at, 193, 196, 204.

Paroli, Signor, in Otello, 179, 180.

Parry's, Dr., Studies of the Great Composers, 297.

Pasqua, Signora, in Falstaff, 191.

Pasta, 120.

Paternoster, Verdi's, 162.

Patti, Mme. Adelina, in Luisa Miller, 103;

in A?da, 172;

235;

in La Traviata, 291.

Pedrotti, 287.

Pellegalli-Rosetti, Signor, in Falstaff, 191, 194.

Penco, Signora, in Trovatore, 115.

Peri and the first opera, 275, 280.

Perosio, 300.

Perugino, 200.

Pessina, Signor, in Falstaff, 194.

Petrovich, Mlle., in Otello, 179.

Piave, Verdi's librettist, 58, 70, 93, 105, 126, 143, 148, 213.

Piccolomini, Mlle., in Luisa Miller, 97, 99;

in La Traviata, 129, 130, 131, 132, 135, 136, 235.

Piccini, 57, 60, 68;

and the growth of opera, 278.

Pini-Corsi, Signor, in Falstaff, 191, 194.

Pinsuti, 101, 287.

Police and I Lombardi, 55;

and Ernani, 59.

Political influences of Verdi, 203.

Polonini, Signor, in Rigoletto, 107.

Ponchielli, 287.

Poniatowski, Prince, and Verdi, 210.

Porporo and the growth of opera, 277.

Pougin's Anecdotic History of Verdi, 296, 297.

Pozzoni-Anastasi, Mme., in A?da, 169.

Provesi, Giovanni, organist, 18, 21, 22;

his prophesy 23;

his death, 26.

Pugnatta, the cobbler, 13.

Quartet in E minor by Verdi, 162.

Raineri, Mme., and Oberto, 31.

Ravogli, Giulia, in Falstaff, 194.

Recitative, origin of, 275.

Requiem mass, Verdi's, 151-161;

lasting nature of, 292.

Ricordi, music publisher, buys Oberto, 31;

letter from Verdi on Nabucco, 36;

purchases Nabucco, 39;

Sassaroli's challenge, 177;

at dinner with Verdi, 190;

215.

Rigoletto, 95, 146, 147;

libretto of, 105;

produced in Venice, London, and Paris, 106;

musical characteristics, 108;

opinions on, 108-113, 133, 135, 197;

place in Verdi's development, 231;

revival of, 260;

diverse opinions on, 268;

continued popularity of, 290, 292.

Rinuccini and the first opera, 275.

Ritter's History of Music, 297.

Roi s'amuse, Le, 105.

Rolla's advice to Verdi, 25.

Ronconi and Oberto, 31;

and Nabucco, 35, 47;

in Rigoletto, 107.

Roosevelt's Life of Verdi, 205, 297.

Rossini, 54, 65, 83, 123, 124, 150, 151, 152, 158, 161;

and Verdi, 206, 225, 226, 227, 259, 267;

and the growth of opera, 278, 282.

Rubini, 120.

Salvi, Signor, and Oberto, 31.

San Carlo Theatre, Naples, 93, 95.

Sanchioli, in Nabucco, 40.

San Marco at Milan, 152.

Sarti, 80.

Sassaroli, Vincenzo, and A?da, 177, 300.

Saunier, Mlle., in Vêpres Siciliennes, 140.

Sbriscia, Mme., in Ballo in Maschera, 145.

Scala, La, Theatre (see La Scala).

Scarlatti and the growth of opera, 277.

Scenes of I Lombardi, 51.

Schiller's Die Raüber, 84;

Kabale und Liebe, 98.

Schumann, 226.

Scotti, Mme., in Ballo in Maschera, 145.

Scribe and Les Vêpres Siciliennes, 139.

Seletti, priest, 19, 21.

Selva, Signor, in Ernani, 59.

Sicilian Vespers (see Vêpres Siciliennes).

Simon Boccanegra, produced at the Fenice theatre, 143;

at Naples, 143.

Solera's libretto of Nabucco, 34, 42;

of I Lombardi, 50;

of Attila, 77.

Spezia, Mlle., in Nino, 46.

Spinet, Verdi's, 12.

Spohr's oratorii, 159;

281.

Spontini, 80;

and the growth of opera, 278.

St. Agata, Verdi's residence, 217, 219, 221.

Stabat Mater, Rossini's, and Verdi's Requiem mass,

158, 161, 162.

Stanford, Dr. Villiers, 38;

on Falstaff, 299.

Stehle, Adelina, in Falstaff, 191.

Steller, Signor, in A?da, 169.

Stiffelio, 103.

Stila fugata, 159.

Stolz, Mme., and Verdi's Requiem, 153, 154

Story of Nabucco, 42;

of I Lombardi, 51-54;

of I Due Foscari, 70-74;

of Attila, 76;

of Masnadieri, 86;

of Luisa Miller, 94;

of Trovatore, 113;

of La Traviata, 127;

of A?da, 170.

Streatfeild's, R.A., Masters of Italian Music, 297.

Street organs and Verdi, 9, 224.

Strepponi and Oberto, 31;

and Nabucco, 35;

consulted by Verdi, 50;

marriage with Verdi, 218.

Tagliafico, Signor, in Rigoletto, 107.

Taglioni, 290.

Tamagno, Signor, in Trovatore, 126;

in Otello, 179, 180;

261.

Tamberlik, in Trovatore, 119, 120;

in Forza del Destino, 148.

Temple, Mme., in Rigoletto, 107.

Teuton church music compared with Italian, 160.

---- and Italian in instrumental music, 165.

Times, musical critic of, 44;

on Nino, 46;

on Atilla, 81;

on Masnadieri, 91;

on Luisa Miller, 101;

on Rigoletto, 110;

on Trovatore, 123;

on Vêpres Siciliennes, 142;

on Un Ballo in Maschera, 145;

298.

Titiens, Mme., in Vêpres Siciliennes, 140, 141;

in Verdi's cantata, 164;

261.

Traviata, La, 95;

and the Fenice Theatre, 126;

story of, 127;

a failure, 128;

at Her Majesty's, 129;

opinions on, 131-138, 146;

at Venice, 214;

place in Verdi's development, 233, 252;

a "sickly opera," 290.

Troubadour, The, 121 (see Trovatore).

Trovatore, 95;

produced at Rome, 113, 115;

in Naples, 116;

in Paris and London, 118;

opinions on, 119-125;

universal success, 125, 128;

135, 138, 146, 197;

and the organ-grinder, 215;

place in Verdi's development, 232, 236, 250, 252, 259;

revival of, 260, 290, 292.

Varesi, baritone, in La Traviata, 128, 214.

"Variety" entertainment and the opera, 290.

Vêpres Siciliennes, 76, 138;

reception of, 139;

at Drury Lane, 140;

opinions on, 140;

a rehearsal in Paris, 213;

its manner, 236;

a departure, 282.

Verdi, birth, 1;

parents, 4;

early circumstances, 6;

characteristics of his music, 7;

and street organs, 9;

acolyte at the village church, 10;

indications of musical aptitude, 11;

his first musical instrument, 12;

sent to school, 13;

first musical training, 14;

goes into the world, 15;

office boy, 18;

and Provesi, 19;

organist of Roncole, 20;

esteem for Barezzi, 21;

conductor of the Busseto Philharmonic Society, 22;

seeks the Milan Conservatoire and is rejected, 24;

under Lavigna, 25;

returns to Busseto and is in love, 26;

marries, 28;

first attempt at a complete opera, 28;

conducts in Haydn's Creation, 29;

conductor of the Milan Philharmonic Society, 30;

his Oberto produced on the stage, 31;

his wife's devotion, 32;

domestic bereavements, 33;

failure of Un Giorni di Regno, 34;

on Nabucco's success, 36, 38;

his "best friends," 37;

famous, 38;

diverse opinions on, 40-47;

alleged indebtedness to Wagner, 46;

his success assured, 49;

chosen to compose the opera d'obbligo for La Scala Theatre

direction, 50;

another triumph, 55;

I Lombardi, 55;

Ernani, 58;

his reception in England, 62;

only Italian composer, 65;

I Due Foscari, 70-75;

Giovanna d'Arco, 75;

Alzira, 76;

Attila, 76-82;

Macbeth, 83;

I Masnadieri, 84-92;

leaves England, 91;

offered the baton at Her Majesty's, 92;

Il Corsaro and La Battaglia di Legnano, 93;

Luisa Miller, 94-103;

his evil genius, 96;

Stiffelio and Il Finto Stanislas, 103;

Rigoletto, 105-113;

Trovatore, 113-126;

La Traviata, 126-138;

letter on the failure of La Traviata, 128;

Les Vêpres Siciliennes, 138-143;

Simon Boccanegra, 143;

Un Ballo in Maschera, 144;

sued by the San Carlo Theatre, Naples, 144;

Forza del Destino, 148, 149;

his Third style, 149;

a writer of sacred music, 150;

and the Rossini mass, 151;

on Manzoni, 153;

his Requiem at San Marco, Milan, 153;

at La Scala Theatre, in Paris, and in London, 154;

as a conductor, 155;

his Requiem as a contribution to church music, 158-162;

other compositions, 162;

the cantata L'Inno delle Nazioni, 163;

at Her Majesty's, 164;

Third period in his career, 167;

A?da, 167-177;

Otello and Falstaff, 168;

Montezuma, 179;

Otello, 177-186;

in Paris, on presentation of Otello, 182;

Falstaff, 187-202;

congratulations from King Humbert, 192;

as a writer of comic music, 201;

a born politician, 203;

politics in his music, 204-208;

political significance of his name, 205;

member of the National Assembly of Parma, 208;

honours, 208-211;

external appearance and character, 212-216;

his fortune and residence, 217;

second marriage, 218;

habits, 218-222;

popularity, 223;

influence on opera, 225;

estimate and characteristics of his work, 228-255;

adverse criticism of, 256-271;

his starting point, 279;

outside influence upon, 281;

and the growth of opera, 282;

in A?da, Otello, and Falstaff, 283;

a "Wagnerite," 284;

his place in musical art, 287;

his imitators, 287;

his masterpieces, 291;

his fame, 292;

bibliography, 293;

literature about-why scanty, 296.

Verdians and anti-Verdians, 57.

Verdi-ites on Luisa Miller, 97.

Verdinian characteristics in Ernani, 63.

Vespri Siciliani, I, 140 (see Vêpres Siciliennes).

Vialetti, in Luisa Miller, 99.

Viardot, Mme., in Trovatore, 118, 120.

Victor Emmanuel and Verdi, 205, 209.

Vienna, Falstaff in, 196.

Vocal music, Italian tendency for, 165.

Wagner and Verdi, 46, 60, 122;

Der Meistersinger and Falstaff, 189, 199;

and Verdi, 181, 182, 198, 199, 202, 228, 235, 240, 241, 242, 244, 245,

249, 251, 253, 254, 264, 267, 275, 279, 280, 284, 285, 287, 298.

"Wagnerian," 284, 286.

"Wagnerite," 284.

Waldmann, Mme., and Verdi's Requiem, 153, 154.

Weber, 263, 264, 267, 281, 285.

Zilli, Emma, in Falstaff, 191, 194.

* * *

Transcriber's Note

The Greek word 'polloi' (many) occurs twice: on pages 159 and 260. On both pages it is used to mean the large number of musically-uneducated people who enjoy opera. On page 159 polloi appears as polloi: on page 260 it appears in Greek letters as πολλο?. It is not clear why 'polloi' should appear in two different forms but both of them have been kept as printed.

In Chapter III the singer of one of the female leads in the opera Oberto is named as Madame Alfred Shaw. She is better known as Mary Shaw. Born Mary Postans, she married the painter Alfred Shaw in 1835.

In Chapter IX the Chorus of Hebrew Slaves is placed in the opera I Lombardi: it belongs, of course, to Nabucco.

Apart from the correction of one or two obvious typographical errors, the spelling is that of the original text.

Several Italian passages, most of them taken from opera librettos, were incorrectly typeset in the original text. These passages have not been corrected in the main text but they are listed below with the changes needed to correct them. The page numbers refer to the original text.

Free to Download MoboReader
(← Keyboard shortcut) Previous Contents (Keyboard shortcut →)
 Novels To Read Online Free

Scan the QR code to download MoboReader app.

Back to Top

shares