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The Go Ahead Boys and Simon's Mine By Ross Kay Characters: 23863

Updated: 2017-12-04 00:03


"Where have you been, Zeke?" called John.

"Down, 'n the Gulch," replied the guide gruffly.

"What did you find? Did you see any one?"

"Nothing to speak of," retorted Zeke, who plainly was not disposed to recount the story of his recent adventures.

Without halting, the guide said, "The Navajos will be coming soon."

"What do you mean?" demanded John excitedly.

"Just what I say," said Zeke.

"Do you mean the whole Navajo tribe or just the two that we've seen?"

"You certainly be the most innocent chap I've ever seen," remarked Zeke irritably, as for a moment he halted and looked sternly at the two boys. "Of course I mean Thomas Jefferson and Kitoni."

"What are they coming up for?" demanded Fred.

"Children should be seen and not heard," retorted Zeke.

John laughed, but the face of his diminutive friend flushed angrily though he did not reply to the statement of the leader.

Plainly Zeke was not inclined to talk. In silence he led the way back to the camp without referring again to his visit or explaining what his future plans were to be.

Neither would he talk after he had arrived, except to remark that it would be time enough to talk when the Navajos came.

Two hours later Thomas Jefferson arrived in camp. The time had been hanging heavily upon the hands of the Go Ahead Boys and the coming of the Indian provided a sharp relief.

"Where's Kitoni?" demanded George as Thomas Jefferson alone entered the camp.

"I cannot say."

"Are you expecting him pretty soon?"

"I expect him to be here when he shall come."

"That's quite a remarkable statement, isn't it?" said John lightly, as the Indian turned away and approached the place where Zeke was lying on his back.

An extensive conversation between the Navajo and the guide followed but the Go Ahead Boys were unable to hear anything that was said.

At last, however, Zeke arose and approaching the place where the Go Ahead Boys were standing, he said, "I hear you boys didn't do what I told you?"

"What was that?" inquired Grant.

"I told you not to leave this camp."

"We didn't go very far away," laughed Grant. "Every one of us got busy and we made some circles around the place here where we're stopping. We tried it three times, but we didn't find any signs of the claim which Simon Moultrie had staked."

"What did you expect to find?" demanded Zeke, a broad grin appearing on his face for a moment.

"The claim," reported Grant sharply.

"Did you think there was a big sign up there stating that this was old Simon Moultrie's property and warning everybody to keep off?"

Without waiting for a reply Zeke turned away, nor were the Go Ahead Boys able to induce him to renew his conversation. No reference was made to the plans for the following day and all four boys were greatly mystified when at last they retired for the night.

The failure of the guide to be interested in the attempts the boys had made to discover the claim for which they were searching was somewhat mortifying. Indeed, Fred was inclined to break out in open rebellion. It was Grant, however, who soothed his feelings and prevailed upon his friend not to speak again to Zeke concerning the efforts they had made.

Early the following morning the missing Navajo and the white man whose face was scarred, who had been an occasional unwelcome visitor in the camp, together approached the place where the boys were awaiting their coming.

"Do you see who that is?" demanded Fred in a low voice.

"Not being aged and infirm and my memory not having failed me as yet," said Grant solemnly, "I do recollect our distinguished visitor."

No more was said although with deep interest the boys watched the approach of the two men, wondering all the time what the coming of the white man implied.

Their curiosity was still further increased when Zeke without waiting for the men to enter the camp met them thirty feet away and at once entered into a low and earnest conversation.

"What's the meaning of all this?" demanded Fred again. "I don't see what that fellow is doing back here and I don't understand why Zeke appears to be so friendly with him. You don't suppose," he added cautiously, "that the guide has decided to go in with the other fellows, do you?"

"Don't you remember what Zeke told you a good many times?" spoke up Grant sharply. "He said that children should be seen and not heard."

Fred's face was expressive of his anger, but he wisely did not respond to the suggestion of his friend.

It was not long before Zeke and the two newcomers entered the camp where breakfast was hastily prepared for the Indian and his companion.

"Zeke," spoke up John, "we don't understand what's going on. What does all this mean?"

"What does all what mean?" retorted Zeke blankly.

"You know just as well as I do. What is this man doing here in our camp again?"

"You'll have to ask him."

"Well, I don't want to ask him. I don't want anything to do with him. He stole Simon Moultrie's diary, he smashed one of our boats, he took one of our packs and no one knows how much more damage he has done. I don't think he ought to be here."

"You might tell him so," suggested Zeke, smiling slightly as he spoke.

"I'm not going to tell him," retorted John. "I'm telling you and you are responsible for this party."

"That's right, so I be," spoke up Zeke as if it was the first time he had heard the statement. "There isn't much use," he continued, "in my looking after you when I find that you don't pay any 'tention to what I tell you. I left word for not one o' you boys to leave the camp while I was gone and when I come back I find that all four of you have been up to all sorts of tricks."

"What are those men waiting for?" demanded Fred, glancing as he spoke at the Navajo and the white man, who were frequently looking toward the rim of the Gulch.

"I think you'll have to ask them," said Zeke as he at once withdrew and joined the men whose actions had caused Fred to ask his question.

Fred's confusion returned when he found that Zeke and the white man apparently were on the best of terms. His anger increased as he became convinced that he was the topic of their conversation, for each frequently glanced in his direction and both laughed as if the reference to the Go Ahead Boy was highly amusing.

Fred's conviction that they were awaiting the coming of some one was strengthened when he joined his friends.

"I'm telling you, fellows, there's something strange about all this," he said positively. "Nobody knows what those men have in mind. I'm getting worried."

"What are you afraid of, Pee Wee?" laughed George, who thus far apparently was unmoved by the anxiety of his friend.

"I'm afraid something will happen that won't do us any good," said Fred.

The fears of the Go Ahead Boy were not expressed, however, for at that moment above the rim of the Gulch appeared the tall form of the white man who had been the companion of the man with the scar.

Blankly the Go Ahead Boys stared at this latest addition to their party, but not one of them was able to offer any explanation of his coming. It was plain, however, that the arrival of this man had been expected, for both the Indians and the man with the scar at once advanced to meet him and the long conversation that followed indicated that his approach was not a surprise.

The confusion in the minds of the Go Ahead Boys increased when a few minutes later Zeke conducted the two white visitors to the place where the boys were standing. As he drew near he doffed his hat and said, "Boys, I want to make you acquainted with Mr. Moultrie. This is the man," he added, as he slapped the tall stranger on his shoulder.

The boys somehow murmured their appreciation of the introduction though the blank manner in which they stared at the visitor indicated that they were more mystified than before.

A moment later Zeke beckoned to the man with the scar to approach. As he came near the place, again Zeke doffed his hat and making a low bow said to the boys, "I want to make you 'quainted with Mr. Pratt. We have been waiting for Moultrie to come," he explained, "and I'm thinking we're about ready to start."

"Where?" demanded Grant.

"You come along and you'll see," was all the explanation Zeke gave.

Dubious as the Go Ahead Boys were they nevertheless decided to follow the suggestion of their guide and in a brief time the entire party, including the two Navajos, set forth from the camp.

The tall stranger was the leader now and silently and swiftly he led the way. Apparently he was fully aware of the destination he was seeking and the most direct method of approaching it. Across the little plateau over which they were moving he led his followers until at last they came to a deep gulch or gully that had been worn into the side of the mountain. Doubtless the torrents which had swept down the hill-side had worn their way into the mountain-side, leaving this deep gulch as the evidence of their power.

The excitement of the boys increased when Mr. Moultrie entered the gully. It was manifest that he was no stranger here and as he swiftly advanced, his followers found difficulty in keeping up with the pace that he set.

For fifteen minutes not a word was spoken although the excitement increased with every passing minute. Indeed, it was manifest that the interest of Zeke and the Navajoes was steadily increasing as they moved farther into the gulch.

Fifteen minutes later the man who had been introduced to the boys as Moultrie abruptly halted and said, "It is right here."

"What is here?" demanded Grant, who was now the spokesman for the Go Ahead Boys.

"Simon Moultrie's claim," said the man simply.

"What!" demanded Grant. "Where is it? I don't see it. What have you to do with it?"

"It's right before you," said the tall man, smiling as he spoke, "and the reason why I am here is because that claim belongs to me. I am James Moultrie, Simon's younger brother. After he found this place and filed his claim he wrote me what he had done and said that he had made his will, leaving the whole thing to me."

"And who is this man?" demanded Grant, turning to Moultrie's companion.

"His name is Pratt. Didn't Zeke introduce him?"

"Yes," answered Grant. "I know who he is but what is he?"

"He's a prospector who has been working around here not far from my brother more or less for five years. My brother was almost insane and Pratt knew it. He tried to keep a little watch over him, but Sime wouldn't have him around. He was about here, however, when my brother died and he helped me locate the claim."

"Were you the man who took our diary?" spoke up John.

"'Your' diary is good," laughed Mr. Moultrie. "Do you think it really was yours?"

"We found it," said John doggedly.

"By the same rule," said Mr. Moultrie, "the man that found this boy when he was lost in the gulch ought to own him. We took the diary all right, but it belonged to us anyway. We were only appropriating what was ours."

"What about that boat that was stove in?"

"That was an accident. We took one of the boats fully expecting to give it back to you within a day or two. We struck a rock and that's all there is to the story."

"But what about that pack?"

"Our supplies were all gone so we took the pack," laughed the man.

"Did Zeke know about it?" suddenly inquired Fred.

"I reckon he wasn't altogether lacking in information," laughed Moultrie.

"Then, why did you bring us all here?" demanded Fred, turning angrily upon the guide.

"I thought you wanted to come here," responded Zeke solemnly.

"We wanted to find the claim," retorted Fred.

"Well, you have found it, haven't you?" inquired Zeke as most of the party laughed loudly.

"We have found what you say is the claim," acknowledged Fred, "but-"

"We have found what is the

claim," said Mr. Moultrie quietly. "Now, I appreciate the zeal of the Go Ahead Boys and I don't intend to forget it. This claim may be worth a hundred million dollars and it may not be worth one red cent. I'm going to give one hundred shares, if a company is organized and we put out the stock, to every one of the Go Ahead Boys."

"How much does Zeke get?" laughed Grant.

"He doesn't get anything," said Mr. Moultrie, "unless we develop a mine here and that means a lot of work and a long wait. Then, if the prospect looks good, we may organize a development company, and if the development shows up well, then we'll organize a mining company. But no one knows now whether he's rich man, poor man, beggar man or thief until all that has been done."

THE END

* * *

THE GO AHEAD BOYS

BY ROSS KAY.

I leave this rule for other's when I'm dead:

Be always sure you're right-THEN GO AHEAD.

-Davy Crockett's Motto.

The love of adventure is inborn in all normal boys. Action is almost a supreme demand in all the stories they read with most pleasure. Here is presented a series of rattling good adventure stories which every live "go ahead" boy will read with unflagging interest. There is action, dash and snap in every tale yet the tone is healthful and there is an underlying vein of resourcefulness and strength that is worth while.

* * *

1 THE GO AHEAD BOYS ON SMUGGLERS' ISLAND.

2 THE GO AHEAD BOYS AND THE TREASURE CAVE.

3 THE GO AHEAD BOYS AND THE MYSTERIOUS OLD HOUSE.

4 THE GO AHEAD BOYS IN THE ISLAND CAMP.

5 THE GO AHEAD BOYS AND THE RACING MOTOR BOAT.

6 THE GO AHEAD BOYS AND SIMON'S MINE.

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BATTLING ON THE SOMME.

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SMASHING THE HINDENBURG LINE.

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6 THE MAKING OF A BIG LEAGUER.

7 COURTNEY OF THE CENTER GARDEN.

8 COVERING THE LOOK-IN CORNER.

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4 TUM TUM, THE JOLLY ELEPHANT.

5 DON, A RUNAWAY DOG.

6 DIDO, THE DANCING BEAR.

7 BLACKIE, A LOST CAT.

8 FLOP EAR, THE FUNNY RABBIT.

9 TINKLE, THE TRICK PONY.

10 LIGHTFOOT, THE LEAPING GOAT.

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2 POLLY'S SUMMER VACATION

3 POLLY'S SENIOR YEAR AT BOARDING SCHOOL

4 POLLY SEES THE WORLD AT WAR

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1 COWS AND CALVES

2 HORSES AND COLTS

3 PIGS AND PIGGIES

4 CHICKENS AND CHICKS

5 DOGS AND PUPPIES

6 CATS AND KITTIES

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Mary Jane is the typical American little girl who bubbles over with fun and the good things in life. We meet her here on a visit to her grandfather's farm where she becomes acquainted with farm life and farm animals and thoroughly enjoys the experience. We next see her going to kindergarten and then on a visit to Florida.

Exquisitely and charmingly written, these are four books which every little girl from five to nine years old will want to read.

1 MARY JANE-HER BOOK

2 MARY JANE-HER VISIT

3 MARY JANE'S KINDERGARTEN

4 MARY JANE DOWN SOUTH

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