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The Bobbsey Twins at Cedar Camp By Laura Lee Hope Characters: 22272

Updated: 2017-12-04 00:03


Bert Bobbsey was really frightened and alarmed, caught as he was in the storm on the big rock, with a wildcat sniffing around at the bottom. He could not even see well enough to throw snowballs at the creature, and, even if he could have driven it away, he felt that it would not be safe for him to come down off the big stone.

"He can't get me while I'm up here, I don't believe," said Bert to himself. "But I can't stay here very long, or I'll be snowed under. What shall I do?"

Indeed he was in what he said afterward was a "regular pickle." And then Bert thought of calling for help. He wondered why he had not done that before.

Standing up on the high rock Bert sent his voice shouting out into the storm.

"Help! Help! Help!" he shouted.

Bert did not know just whom he expected to help him. He did not know how far he was from Mrs. Bimby's cabin, nor how far he was away from Cedar Camp. All he knew was that he was in trouble and needed help. The only way was to shout as loudly as he could.

At his first call the wildcat at the foot of the rock snarled, growled, and tried to leap up. But the sides were too steep and smooth. Bert could catch glimpses of the animal when the snow came down a little less heavily now and again, making a sort of opening in the white curtain.

"Help! Help! Help!" cried Bert again and again.

Curiously enough it was Flossie and Freddie, who in the blizzard had wandered near to the rock, who heard Bert's cry. Through the storm the voice came to them, though of course they did not know it was their brother calling.

"Hark!" exclaimed Freddie, who, with his sister, had been floundering about in the drifts, the small Bobbsey twins trying to find their former tracks in the snow so they could work their way back. But the flakes had fallen into their footprints, and had been blown over them so deeply that the prints were blotted out.

"Do you hear that?" asked Freddie of Flossie.

"Yes," she answered, as the voice came to her ears. "It's somebody saying he'll help us."

That is what she thought it was-someone wanting to help her and Freddie, not someone in need of help.

Again came the call, and it sounded so close that the two small Bobbsey twins knew which way to go to reach it.

"We're coming! We're coming!" shouted Freddie. "Come on, Rover! I guess that's daddy coming to help us! We're coming!"

With a bark the dog bounded through the storm after the two children, and you can imagine how surprised Bert Bobbsey on the rock was when he heard shouts in answer to his own. He did not know, of course, that Freddie and Flossie were anywhere near him. He thought it was his father and some of the men from Cedar Camp.

A little later the small Bobbsey twins came within sight of the big rock. They could not see Bert on it on account of the blinding snow. But Rover caught the smell of the wildcat, and with a savage bark he sprang to drive the creature away.

"Good old Rover! Good dog!" cried Bert, as the snow stopped for a moment and he caught sight of the dog that he knew. "Sic him, Rover!"

And Rover rushed at the wildcat with such fierceness that the beast scuttled back to its den under the half-fallen tree. And then Bert looked and saw Flossie and Freddie.

At the same time the small Bobbsey twins looked up and caught a glimpse of their brother on the rock.

"Oh, Bert!" cried Freddie, "did you come out to look for us? We're lost!"

"So am I, I guess," Bert answered, as he jumped down, landing in a bank of soft snow and beginning to pet Rover. "Where in the world did you children come from?"

"We came out after daddy and Mr. Jim and Mr. Case," Freddie went on. "They're going to take some things to Mrs. Bimby."

"Mrs. Bimby!" cried Bert "Why, I left her and Nan this morning. They haven't got hardly anything left to eat. But where is the camp?"

"Don't you know?" asked Freddie. "We don't know. We're lost."

"That's bad," said Bert, looking at the swirling snow all about. "And the wildcat ate my lunch."

"We've a little left," Flossie said. "Did you save any chestnuts, Bert?"

"I brought some, but I ate 'em. But Nan's got some, back at Mrs. Bimby's cabin, if we can find it. You say daddy started out after us?"

"Yes, to find you and Nan and take something to Mrs. Bimby," explained Freddie. "Her husband was at our camp. He got lost in the snow, and he said his wife didn't have anything in the cupboard."

"She didn't-not very much," Bert said. "I shot a rabbit, but I guess that's all eaten now. But say, you two oughtn't to be out here alone!"

"We're not alone now," Flossie said. "We got you with us!"

"Well, I'm glad you met me," Bert said. "And I'm glad Rover drove that wildcat away. I scared one with snowballs, but I couldn't hit this one very well. Now we'd better try to get back to camp. I guess there's going to be another storm."

"Will it snow a whole lot and cover us all up?" asked Flossie, anxiously.

The poor little girl had had quite enough of snow, cold wind, blizzards, and bad weather of all sorts.

"Oh, I guess maybe it won't snow so very hard," answered Bert. He did not want to confess to Flossie and Freddie that he was a bit frightened.

"Maybe Rover could show us which way to go to find Cedar Camp," suggested Freddie. "Dogs are smart, and Rover is a good dog."

"He was nice to us when we sat under the pine tree," went on Flossie. "And he ran out and brought in pine cones and he shook himself and made snow fly all over me."

"You didn't try to eat pine cones, did you?" asked Bert.

"Oh, no," Flossie answered. "We just threw them for Rover to play with. But I'm too tired to play now. I want to go to bed."

"Oh, Flossie, you don't want to go to bed now, do you?" asked Bert. "Why, if you were to lie down in the snow you'd freeze."

"I don't want to go to sleep in the snow," Flossie said, and she was beginning to whine a little. No wonder, for it had been a hard day for her and Freddie.

"No, I don't want to sleep in the snow," the little girl said. "I want my own little bunk at the camp."

"Well, we'll be there pretty soon," Bert said, as kindly as he could.

"Carry me!" begged Flossie, when she had stumbled on a little farther, walking between her two brothers.

"All right. I guess I can carry you," said Bert, but he was worrying about his leg a little. It was not so bad when he bore his own weight on it. But could he carry Flossie?

However, he was not going to give up without trying, and so, when they came to a little sheltered place, where the snow was not quite so deep, Bert stooped down.

"I'll take you pickaback, Flossie," he said.

"Oh, I like that!" laughed his sister, as she climbed up on her brother's back.

Bert was not sure whether or not he was going to like it, but he said nothing. He had to shut his teeth tight to keep from crying out with pain as he straightened up with Flossie on his back, for her weight, small as she was, put too much weight on his injured leg. Flossie was quite "chunky" for her size, as Dinah was wont to say.

"Hold steady now, Flossie," directed Bert, as he straightened up. "Put your arms around my neck."

"I guess I know how to ride piggy-back!" laughed Flossie. She was not so tired now, when something like this happened to change her thoughts.

Bert staggered along through the snow with his sister on his back. Though he did not want to say so, his leg hurt him very much. But he tried not to limp, though Freddie at last noticed it, and asked:

"Have you got a stone in your shoe, Bert?"

"Oh, no, I-I just sprained it a little," Bert answered in a low voice, so Flossie would not hear. For of course if she had known it hurt her brother to carry her she would not ask him to. But just then Flossie was reaching up to take hold of a branch of a tree as Bert passed beneath it. And, catching hold of it, Flossie, with a merry laugh, showered herself and Bert with snow that clung to the branch.

"Don't, Flossie, dear!" Bert had to say. "There's snow enough without pulling down any more. And we'll get plenty if the clouds spill more flakes."

"Do you think it will storm some more?" Freddie wanted to know.

Bert did not answer right away. He was thinking what he could do about Flossie. If she could not walk then she must be carried, but he felt that he could not hold her on his back much longer, his leg was paining too much.

Just then the sight of Rover, the big, strong dog, floundering about in the snow, gave Bert an idea. Rover did not seem to care how much breath or strength he wasted, for he ran everywhere, barking and trying to dig things out from under the drifts.

"Oh, Flossie! wouldn't you like to ride on Rover's back?" asked poor, tired Bert.

"Oh, that will be lovely!" cried the little girl.

"Here, Rover!" cried Freddie.

The dog came leaping through the snow, very likely hoping to have some sticks thrown that he might race after them. But he did not seem surprised when Flossie was placed on his back and held there by Freddie on one side and Bert on the other.

"Now I'm having a ride on a make-believe elephant!" laughed Flossie. Rover could not run with the little girl on his back, and I must say he behaved very nicely, carrying her along through the drifts. Her legs hung "dangling down-o," but that did not matter.

"I guess I'm rested now," said Flossie, after a bit. "I'm cold, and it will make me warmer to walk. I'll walk and hold your hand, Bert."

If Rover was glad to have the load taken from his back he did not say so, but by the way he raced on ahead when Flossie got off I think he was.

"I guess there's more snow coming," suddenly cried Bert.

There was, the flakes coming down almost as thick and fast as when the blizzard first swirled about Cedar Camp. Bert took the hands of Flossie and Freddie and led them on through the storm. It was hard work, and the smaller children were crying with the cold and from fear at the coming darkness when Rover suddenly barked.

"Hark!" cried Bert. "I guess someone is coming!"

"Maybe it's daddy!" half sobbed Flossie.

Shouts were coming through the storm-the shouts of men. Rover barked louder and rushed forward. Bert held to the hands of his brother and sister and peered anxiously through the falling flakes and the fast-gathering darkness.

Suddenly a man rushed forward, and, a moment later, had Flossie and Freddie in his arms, hugging and kissing them. Then he clasped Bert around the shoulders.

"Daddy! Daddy!" cried Flossie and Freddie together. "You found us, didn't you?"

"Yes. But I didn't know you were away from camp," said Mr. Bobbsey, for it was he. "Where's Nan?" he asked Bert quickly, while Rover leaped about his master, Mr. Case, and Old Jim.

"She's at Mrs. Bimby's cabin," Bert answered.

"My wife!" exclaimed Old Jim. "Is she-is she all right?"

"She was when I came away this morning to get help," said Bert. "I shot a rabbit for her and Nan. It was good, too. But I guess she'll need food now."

"We have a lot for her," said Tom Case. "Rover, you rascal!" he went on

, patting his dog, "I wondered where you ran away to, but it's a good thing you found the children."

"And he drove away the wildcat," Bert announced.

It was a happy, joyful party in spite of the storm, which was getting worse. Mr. Bobbsey and the two men with him had gotten off the road that led to Old Jim's cabin, and it was because of that fact that they had found the lost children.

"What had we better do?" asked Mr. Bobbsey, when it was learned that Bert, Freddie and Flossie had really suffered no harm from being lost. "Should we go back to Cedar Camp or to your cabin, Mr. Bimby?"

"The cabin is nearer," said Tom Case. "If you folks go there, with Jim to guide you, I'll back track to Cedar Camp and fetch a sled. You can ride the Bobbsey twins home in that."

"Yes, we'd better go to my cabin," said Old Jim. "We can make room for you, and we'll take the food with us."

So this plan was decided on, Tom Case and Rover going to Cedar Camp for the sled, while Mr. Bobbsey, Mr. Bimby and the three children trudged back to Mrs. Bimby's cabin.

You can imagine how glad Nan and the old woman were to see not only Bert but the others.

"Oh, I was afraid when it began to storm again," said Nan, as she hugged Flossie and Freddie. "But I never dreamed you two would be out in it."

"Nor I," said their father.

"You ought to see the bear skin we found!" exclaimed Freddie, to change the subject. "It's going to be for Mrs. Bimby, to keep her warm."

"Bless their hearts!" murmured Old Jim's wife. "I can keep warm all right, but it's hard to get food in a storm."

However, there was plenty of that now, and they all soon gathered about the table and had a hot meal. The second storm was not as bad as the first had been, and later that evening up came a big sled, filled with straw and drawn by powerful horses, and in it was Mrs. Bobbsey and some of the men from Cedar Camp.

After a joyful reunion, in piled the Bobbsey twins with their father and mother, and good-byes were called to the Bimby family, who now had food enough to last through many storms.

There was not much trouble getting to Cedar Camp, though the road was so blocked with snow that once the sled almost upset. But before midnight the Bobbsey twins were back in the cabin, all safe together once again.

"We've had a lot of adventures since we came here," said Bert, as they sat about the cozy fire.

"Too many," remarked his mother. "I don't know when I've been so worried, and it was worse after Flossie and Freddie went away."

"We won't run away again," promised the small twins.

"Did you find your Christmas trees, Daddy?" asked Nan.

"No, not yet," he replied. "I guess they're lost, and we'll have to cut more."

But the next day, when the storm ceased and the sun shone, a man came to camp with word about the missing trees. The railroad cars on which they were loaded had been switched off on a wrong track and had been held at a distant station awaiting someone to claim them. This Mr. Bobbsey did, and soon the shipment of Christmas trees was on its way to Lakeport.

"And as long as they are found there is no excuse for staying in Cedar Camp any longer," said Mr. Bobbsey.

But the children like it so that they prevailed on their father and mother to remain a few days longer. And then the Bobbsey twins had many good times, playing in the woods and about the sawmill. For there came a thaw after the big storms, and most of the snow melted. Bert and Nan got more chestnuts, too.

"But I hope we'll have some snow for Christmas," said Nan.

"So we can make a snow fort!" added Freddie.

"And a snowman and knock his hat off!" laughed Flossie.

"I should think you'd had enough snow," remarked their mother.

But the Bobbsey twins seldom had enough of anything when there was fun and excitement going, and you may be sure this was not the last of their adventures. But now let us say good-bye.

THE END

This Isn't All!

Would you like to know what became of the good friends you have made in this book?

Would you like to read other stories continuing their adventures and experiences, or other books quite as entertaining by the same author?

On the reverse side of the wrapper which comes with this book, you will find a wonderful list of stories which you can buy at the same store where you got this book.

Don't Throw Away the Wrapper

Use it as a handy catalog of the books you want some day to have. But in case you do mislay it, write to the Publishers for a complete catalog.

The Bobbsey Twins Books

For Little Men and Women

By LAURA LEE HOPE

Author of "The Bunny Brown Series," Etc.

Illustrated. Every Volume Complete in Itself.

These books for boys and girls between the ages of three and ten stand among children and their parents of this generation where the books of Louisa May Alcott stood in former days. The haps and mishaps of this inimitable pair of twins, their many adventures and experiences are a source of keen delight to imaginative children.

THE BOBBSEY TWINS

THE BOBBSEY TWINS IN THE COUNTRY

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT THE SEASHORE

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT SCHOOL

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT SNOW LODGE

THE BOBBSEY TWINS ON A HOUSEBOAT

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT MEADOWBROOK

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT HOME

THE BOBBSEY TWINS IN A GREAT CITY

THE BOBBSEY TWINS ON BLUEBERRY ISLAND

THE BOBBSEY TWINS ON THE DEEP BLUE SEA

THE BOBBSEY TWINS IN THE GREAT WEST

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT CEDAR CAMP

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT THE COUNTY FAIR

THE BOBBSEY TWINS CAMPING OUT

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AND BABY MAY

THE BOBBSEY TWINS KEEPING HOUSE

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT CLOVERBANK

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT CHERRY CORNERS

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AND THEIR SCHOOLMATES

THE BOBBSEY TWINS TREASURE HUNTING

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT SPRUCE LAKE

THE BOBBSEY TWINS' WONDERFUL SECRET

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT THE CIRCUS

GROSSET & DUNLAP, Publishers, NEW YORK

The Bunny Brown Series

By LAURA LEE HOPE

Author of the Popular "Bobbsey Twins" Books, Etc.

Illustrated. Each Volume Complete in Itself

These stories are eagerly welcomed by the little folks from about five to ten years of age. Their eyes fairly dance with delight at the lively doings of inquisitive little Bunny Brown and his cunning, trustful Sister Sue.

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue on Grandpa's Farm

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue Playing Circus

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue at Camp Rest-A-While

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue at Aunt Lu's City Home

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Big Woods

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue on an Auto Tour

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue and their Shetland Pony

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue Giving a Show

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue at Christmas Tree Cove

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Sunny South

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue Keeping Store

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue and Their Trick Dog

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue at a Sugar Camp

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue on the Rolling Ocean

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue on Jack Frost Island

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue at Shore Acres

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue at Berry Hill

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue at Skytop

Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue at the Summer Carnival

GROSSET & DUNLAP, Publishers, NEW YORK

The Honey Bunch Books

By HELEN LOUISE THORNDYKE

Individual Colored Wrappers and Text Illustrations

Honey Bunch is a dainty, thoughtful little girl, and to know her is to take her to your heart at once.

Little girls everywhere will want to discover what interesting experiences she is having wherever she goes.

HONEY BUNCH: JUST A LITTLE GIRL

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST VISIT TO THE CITY

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST DAYS ON THE FARM

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST VISIT TO THE SEASHORE

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST LITTLE GARDEN

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST DAYS IN CAMP

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST AUTO TOUR

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST TRIP ON THE OCEAN

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST TRIP WEST

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST SUMMER ON AN ISLAND

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST TRIP TO THE GREAT LAKES

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST TRIP IN AN AIRPLANE

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST VISIT TO THE ZOO

HONEY BUNCH: HER FIRST BIG ADVENTURE

GROSSET & DUNLAP, Publishers, NEW YORK

The Sunny Boy Series

By RAMY ALLISON WHITE

Children! Meet Sunny Boy, a little fellow with big eyes and an inquiring disposition who finds the world at large a wonderful place to live in. There is always something doing when Sonny Boy is around.

In the first book of the series he visits his grandfather in the country and learns of many marvelous things on a farm, and in the other books listed below he has many exciting adventures which every child will enjoy reading about.

SUNNY BOY IN THE COUNTRY

SUNNY BOY AT THE SEASHORE

SUNNY BOY IN THE BIG CITY

SUNNY BOY IN SCHOOL AND OUT

SUNNY BOY AND HIS SCHOOLMATES

SONNY BOY AND HIS GAMES

SUNNY BOY IN THE FAR WEST

SUNNY BOY ON THE OCEAN

SUNNY BOY WITH THE CIRCUS

SUNNY BOY AND HIS BIG DOG

SUNNY BOY IN THE SNOW

SUNNY BOY AT WILLOW FARM

SUNNY BOY AND HIS CAVE

SUNNY BOY AT RAINBOW LAKE

GROSSET & DUNLAP, Publishers, NEW YORK

Children of All Lands

By MADELINE BRANDEIS

Illustrated. Every Volume Complete in Itself.

Fact and fancy are so blended in these charming stories and the manners and customs of other lands are so interwoven with the plots that reading and learning becomes a joy.

Mitz and Fritz of Germany

A little German boy and his sister travel in a gypsy wagon through the beautiful Rhine country and have the most glorious adventure of their lives.

Little Anne of Canada

A fascinating story of a little girl who had many adventures in the lumber camps of the great Canadian Northwoods.

The Little Mexican Donkey Boy

A charming story of a Mexican boy hero named Dodo, or Sleepy-head, and his funny little Mexican burro, Amigo.

Little Philippe of Belgium

How little Philippe wandered all over Belgium looking for the mysterious pair, Tom and Zelie, makes a thrilling story.

Shaun O'day of Ireland

A very beautiful story of Irish children and through which run many legends of Old Ireland.

Little Jeanne of France

Every child will love this story of French children, laid in the most marvelous city in the world, Paris.

The Little Dutch Tulip Girl

Tom, a little American boy, dreamed about going to Holland. In his dreams he met Katrina, the little Dutch Tulip Girl, who turned out to be a real honest-to-goodness girl.

The Little Swiss Wood Carver

This is the absorbing tale of how Seppi, the ambitious Swiss lad, made his dream of becoming a skillful wood carver come true.

The Wee Scotch Piper

The story of how the music-loving Ian, the young son of a Scotch shepherd, earned his longed-for bag pipes and his musical education.

The Little Indian Weaver

This is an appealing story of a little Navajo girl, Bah, and a little freckle-faced white boy, Billie.

GROSSET & DUNLAP, Publishers, NEW YORK

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