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   Chapter 16 CONCLUSION

Famous American Belles of the Nineteenth Century By Virginia Tatnall Peacock Characters: 32868

Updated: 2017-12-04 00:02


When I was writing of what remains to us of the London of Shakespeare, I might have mentioned the four-century-old gateway of Lincoln's Inn, in Chancery Lane, that Ben Jonson helped to build, and close by which, at 24 Old Buildings, Cromwell's secretary, John Thurloe, lived in 1654; and although in my first chapter I gave a fairly lengthy list of famous authors and artists who were Cockneys by birth, I by no means made it so long as I could have done. Hablot K. Browne, otherwise "Phiz," the chief of Dickens's artists, was born in Kennington, and lived for eight years, towards the close of his career, at 99 Ladbroke Grove Road; Lord Lytton, whom Tennyson unkindly described as "the padded man that wears the stays," and who was for a time a more popular novelist than either Dickens or Thackeray, was born at 31 Baker Street, and lived in after years at 12 Grosvenor Square, and at 36 Hertford Street; Gibbon was born at Putney, and lived for some years at 7 Bentinck Street, which he said was "the best house in the world"; John Leech was born over his father's coffee-shop in Ludgate Hill, and lived when he had risen to fame at 32 Brunswick Square, and passed the last years of his life at 6 The Terrace, Kensington; and one who I confess interests me at least as much as any of these, Douglas Jerrold, was born in Greek Street, Soho, lived as a boy at Broad Court, in the same neighbourhood, and afterwards shifted about into half-a-dozen different parts of London, and died in 1857 at Kilburn Priory, on the skirts of St. John's Wood. West Lodge, his house at Lower Putney Common, still stands much as it was when he occupied it, with his mulberry tree still growing in that garden round which, one memorable summer afternoon, he and Dickens, Forster, Maclise, and Macready gave each other "backs," and played a joyously undignified game of leapfrog. I don't know whether anybody reads Mrs. Caudle's Curtain Lectures now, but everybody read them and laughed over them when they were new, and Jerrold's best jokes and witticisms are much too well known to leave me an excuse for repeating any of them here. For all his bitter tongue, he was kind, generous, sensitive, afire with a fine scorn of wrong, injustice, and every variety of social humbug and snobbery. "A small delicately-formed, bent man," is Edmund Yates's recollection of him, "with long grey hair combed back from his forehead, with grey eyes deep-set under penthouse brows, and a way, just as the inspiration seized him, of dangling a double-eyeglass which hung round his neck by a broad black ribbon."

THURLOE'S LODGINGS. 24 OLD SQUARE. LINCOLN'S INN.

Browning, who was born at Hanover Cottage, Southampton Street, Camberwell, in 1812, lived at De Vere Gardens, and at 19 Warwick Crescent. Removing from 74 Gloucester Place in 1842, Elizabeth Barrett and her autocratic father went to 50 Wimpole Street, and calling there with a friend in 1845, Robert Browning was introduced to her. It was from and to this house that so many of those wonderful love-letters of theirs were written, and little more than a year after their first meeting, her father stubbornly refusing his consent to their union, she stole out by this sedate and sombre door one autumn morning to join her waiting lover, and they were quietly and clandestinely married at the old church round the corner in Marylebone Road-the same church in which, in the same year, Dickens, then living at Devonshire House and within sight of it, married Mr. Dombey, with Captain Cuttle looking on at the ceremony from the gallery.

At 82 Wimpole Street Wilkie Collins died; and at 67, lived Henry Hallam, the historian, and his son Arthur, the friend of Tennyson, who often visited him there, and has enshrined his memory for ever in his In Memoriam; where, too, he pictures this house and this street:

"Dark house, by which once more I stand

Here in the long unlovely street,

Doors, where my heart was used to beat

So quickly, waiting for a hand.

A hand that can be clasped no more-

Behold me, for I cannot sleep,

And like a guilty thing I creep

At earliest morning to the door.

He is not here; but far away

The noise of life begins again,

And ghastly thro' the drizzling rain

On the bald street breaks the blank day."

Theodore Hook, another Cockney, was born in Charlotte Street, Bedford Square; Captain Marryat, another, in Great George Street, Westminster, and whilst he was writing the most famous of his books he lived at 8 Duke Street, St. James's, and at Sussex Lodge, in the Fulham Road. Ruskin, who, like Browning, is included in my earlier list of Cockneys, was born at 54 Hunter Street, and made his home for many years at 163 Denmark Hill, both of which houses still survive him.

CAPTAIN MARRYAT. DUKE STREET. ST. JAMES.

Benjamin Franklin lived at 7 Craven Street, Strand; before he rented a house in London after Johnson's death, Boswell had lodgings, on his annual visits to town, in Half Moon Street, Piccadilly, in Conduit Street, Regent Street, and in Old Bond Street; where Sterne dwelt before him and Gibbon after him, and at 27A, Harrison Ainsworth, later than them all; but Ainsworth's more notable residence, where he lived when he was in the full glory of his enormous popularity, is Kensal House, out in the no-longer-rural district of Kensal Green.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN'S HOUSE. CRAVEN STREET.

At 19 Albert Gate, Sloane Street, lived Charles Reade, who was nearly all his life quarrelling with his critics and fighting against legal injustices with an almost ungovernable fury, and yet David Christie Murray said he was one of the four men he had met who were "distinguished by that splendid urbanity of manner which was once thought to express the acme of high breeding.... A beautiful, stately cordiality commonly marked his social manner, but he could be moved to a towering rage by an act of meanness, treachery, or oppression; and in his public correspondence he was sometimes downright vitriolic." Anthony Trollope died at 34 Welbeck Street; and Lord Macaulay at Holly Lodge on Campden Hill. George Cruikshank lived in the queer, dull-looking little house that still remains at 263 Hampstead Road, and from that address put forth his groundless claims to being the originator of Ainsworth's novels, Jack Sheppard and The Miser's Daughter, and Dickens's Oliver Twist. Ainsworth was still living, and strenuously denied his assertions; Dickens was dead, but there existed a letter of his about the illustrations to his book that sufficiently proved that the story was not written round Cruickshank's drawings, as the aged artist seemed to have persuaded himself it was. A greater artist than Cruickshank (and another Cockney, by the way) was born in Cumberland Market, near Regent's Park, and died in a sponging-house in Eyre Street Hill, Clerkenwell Road, in 1804. That was George Morland. Two years before his death he went with his wife and put up at the Bull Inn, at Highgate, which was kept by a former acquaintance of his. He is supposed to have utilised as a studio the large room with three bay windows that runs above the bar the full width of the building. He entertained Gainsborough and Romney and other contemporary artists there, but within a few months had had a fierce quarrel with the landlord and returned to lodge with his brother in Dean Street, Soho. He was by then showing the effects of his reckless dissipations, and looked "besotted and squalid and cadaverous; hanging cheeks and pinched nose, contracted nostrils, bleared and bloodshot eyes, swelled legs, a palsied hand, and tremulous voice bespeaking the ruin of what had once been the soundest of frames." Drunk or sober, he worked rapidly and with unfailing mastery, but he was generally cheated by those around him of the due reward of his labours. Going on a short holiday to Brighton, he wrote giving his brother this list of what he had drunk in a single day: "Hollands gin, rum and milk-before breakfast. Coffee-for breakfast. Hollands, porter, shrub, ale, Hollands, port wine and ginger, bottled ale-these before dinner. Port wine at dinner. Porter, bottled porter, punch, porter, ale, opium and water. Port wine at supper. Gin, shrub, and rum on going to bed." At the bottom of the list he sketched a tombstone bearing a skull and crossbones, and by way of epitaph: "Here lies a drunken dog." And debts and duns and death in the sponging-house were the inevitable end of it.

CRUIKSHANK. 263 HAMPSTEAD ROAD.

Lady Blessington held her brilliant salon at 8 Seamore Place, Mayfair, before in 1836 she removed to the more noted Gore House, Kensington, and welcomed to her splendid drawing-rooms Byron, Lytton, Disraeli, Landor, Marryat, Dickens, Thackeray, Sydney Smith, Maclise, Hook, and all the greatest men of the day in literature, art, politics, and society, till in 1849 she was overwhelmed with financial embarrassments and fled to Paris, where she died the year after. Gore House has vanished from its place long since, and the Albert Hall more than covers the site of it. But Holland House, which was equally or more celebrated for its magnificent social gatherings in the first half of last century and earlier, still holds its ground. Addison lived there after his marriage to the Countess of Warwick in 1716, and from his bedroom there, in his last hours, sent for his dissipated stepson in order that he might see "how a Christian can die."

ROBERT BROWNING

GEORGE MORLAND. THE "BULL INN" HIGHGATE.

Perhaps more interesting than either of these, from a literary standpoint, is the house of Samuel Rogers, 22 St. James's Place, overlooking the Green Park. You can scarcely open the memoirs of any man of letters of his time, but you may read some account of a breakfast or a dinner at Rogers's. "What a delightful house it is!" says Macaulay. "It looks out on the Green Park just at the most pleasant point. The furniture has been selected with a delicacy of taste quite unique.... In the drawing-room the chimney-pieces are carved by Flaxman into the most beautiful Grecian forms. The bookcase is painted by Stothard, in his very best manner, with groups from Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Boccaccio. The pictures are not numerous, but every one is excellent. The most remarkable objects in the dining-room are, I think, a cast of Pope, taken after death by Roubiliac; a noble model in terra-cotta by Michael Angelo, from which he afterwards made one of his finest statues, that of Lorenzo de Medici; and, lastly, a mahogany table on which stands an antique vase. When Chantrey dined with Rogers some time ago he took particular notice of the vase and the table on which it stands, and asked Rogers who made the table. 'A common carpenter,' said Rogers. 'Do you remember the making of it?' said Chantrey. 'Certainly,' said Rogers, in some surprise; 'I was in the room while it was finished with the chisel, and gave the workman directions about placing it.' 'Yes,' said Chantrey, 'I was the carpenter.'" Byron, who was a guest at Holland House and at Lady Blessington's, was a frequent guest at Rogers's table also. It was Rogers who introduced him to Miss Milbanke, the unfortunate lady who was to become his wife; and Byron seems by turns to have admired him, disliked him, and looked upon him with a sort of laughing contempt. "When Sheridan was on his deathbed," he writes, "Rogers aided him with purse and person: this was particularly kind in Rogers, who always spoke ill of Sheridan (to me, at least); but indeed he does that of everybody. Rogers is the reverse of the line 'The best good man with the worst-natured Muse,' being 'The worst good man with the best-natured Muse.' His Muse being all sentiment and sago, while he himself is a venomous talker. I say 'worst good man,' because he is (perhaps) a good man-at least he does good now and then, as well he may, to purchase himself a shilling's worth of Salvation for his Slanders. They are so little, too-small talk, and old womanny; and he is malignant too, and envious."

ROGERS. ST. JAMES'S PLACE. FROM GREEN PARK.

Rogers had a fine head, a distinguished manner, a bland, silky way of saying the most cutting and cynical things. He was not so much a poet as a banker of a poetical temperament. His poetry will presently be forgotten, but his breakfasts and his dinners will be remembered because he lived to be well over ninety, was a very wealthy man of taste, and had the will and the means to play the generous host to some three generations of the wisest, wittiest, greatest men of his era, and several of them said brighter and better things in his dining and drawing-rooms than he ever wrote in his books. He covered such a long span of time that he could entertain Sheridan, who was born in 1751, and Dickens, who died in 1870. Many of the same glorious company had a meeting-place also until a more recent day at Bath House, Mayfair, where Lady Ashburton, the great friend of the Carlyles, held famous receptions, of which Carlyle himself and the Brookfields have left us reminiscences. And the invaluable Allingham has one or two notes about her in his Diary; one dated 5th November 1875, in which he says Carlyle passed his house "about four to-day. I overtook him in the Fulham Road, and walked with him to Lady Ashburton's door at Knightsbridge. He said, 'Browning in his young days wore a turn-down shirt collar with a ribbon for a necktie, and a green coat. I first met him one evening at Leigh Hunt's, a modest youth, with a good strong face and a head of dark hair. He said little, but what he said was good.'" Possibly the talk fell upon him because Browning was among the guests he was to meet that day at Lady Ashburton's.

BORROW'S HOUSE. HEREFORD SQUARE.

William Morris and Burne Jones lived and worked together at 17 Red Lion Square; Steele used to live in Bloomsbury Square, where later Disraeli and his father lived, at No. 5. George Borrow lived at 23 Hereford Square, South Kensington. Berkeley Square has a peculiar attraction for me, less because Horace Walpole had his home at 42, than because Colley Cibber dwelt as a very old man at No. 20. In the same way I am not so much drawn to Gower Street by the fact that in a greatly altered house there Darwin used to live, as I am to that shabby Percy Street, Tottenham Court Road, where Albert Smith had a house at which Sala once visited him. Walpole and Darwin are, of course, incomparably greater men than Cibber and Albert Smith, but these last two have a curious fascination for me. I read Smith's Christopher Tadpole and The Scattergood Family when I was a boy, and his figure flits elusively in the background of Dickens's reputation, wrapped in a very characteristic mid-Victorian bohemianism, and, without precisely knowing why, I have taken a sort of liking to him. Sala says he was a kind, cheery little man, who when he was at work at home wore a blue blouse. "I recall him," he says, "as a sturdy-looking, broad-shouldered, short-necked man, with grey eyes and flowing locks of light brown, and large side-whiskers; later in life he wore a beard. His voice was a high treble." His study in Percy Street was littered always with French novels, dolls, pipes, cheap jewellery, cakes of soap made in the image of fruit, minature Swiss chalets, fancy costumes, and such a miscellany of odds and ends that it had the appearance of an old curiosity shop. As for Cibber, I began by feeling contempt for him, because of the scorn Pope pours on him in The Dunciad, and the character for dulness that was imposed upon him by that savage satirist and his host of imitators. But when I read some of Cibber's comedies (such as The Careless Husband, and Love Makes a Man) I found them amusing and clever in their fashion, certainly not dull, and when I dropped one day into the National Portrait Gallery and saw that coloured bust of him under a glass case and leering through the glass eyes that have been fitted into his head-I succumbed, and acquired a sneaking regard for the gay old coxcomb that is not yet beginning to cool. You cannot read his plays and his delightful Apology for his Life without getting interested in him; and then if you go and look at that bust you will feel that you know the sly, witty, shrewd, ruddy-visaged, not over clean, furtive, leery old rascal as intimately as if you had been acquainted with him in the flesh.

But if one

set out to write of the homes and haunts of these minor celebrities this book would be endless; moreover, many amongst them that have some peculiar attraction for me might have no interest for any one else; and many that for special reasons mean a great deal to you might mean nothing at all to me. So, as the wiser course, I have, in the main, limited my survey to the houses of men and women who are considerable enough to be known, more or less, by every one who has even a nodding acquaintance with literature, and to that extent my chronicle is at an end.

* * *

INDEX

Addison, Joseph, 3, 28, 150, 339

Addison Bridge Place, 199, 203

Adelphi Terrace, 114, 223, 233

Ainsworth, W. Harrison, 238, 334, 337

Akenside, Mark, 3, 28, 150

Albany, The, 199

Albemarle Street, 181

Albert Gate, Sloane Street, 334

Albion Street, 296

Aldermanbury, 19

Aldersgate Street, 12, 17, 19

Aldford Street, 178, 181

Aldgate, 4

Allingham, William, 259, 262, 276, 280, 281, 285, 343, 344

Ampton Street, 275

Arbuthnot, John, 31, 150

Archer, Thomas, 2

Argyll Place, 167

-- Street, 167

Arlington Road, 245

Ashburton, Lady, 343, 344

Atterbury, Francis, 31

Austin, Alfred, 253

Avenue Road, 245

Ayrton, William, 207

Bacon, Francis (Lord Verulam), 6

Baillie, Joanna, 145, 194

Baker Street, 328

Balmanno, Mary, 233

Barbauld, Mrs., 146, 220

Barber, Francis, 102

Barham, R. H., 238

Barrett, Elizabeth, 331, 332

Bartholomew Close, 19, 38, 50

Barton, Bernard, 219, 222, 226

Basire, James, 118, 120

Bath House, Mayfair, 343

Bathurst, Dr., 94

Battersea, 26-35, 260

Bayham Street, 314

Beauclerk, Topham, 63, 114

Beaumont, Francis, 20

Bellott, Stephen, 14, 15, 16

Bennet Street, 194

Bentinck Street, 315, 328

Berkeley Square, 344

Besant, Sir Walter, 146

Bird-in-Hand Court, Cheapside, 23

Bishopsgate, 10

Blackstone, Sir William, 80

Blake, William, 9, 118-139, 271

Blandford Square, 245

Blessington, Lady, 338

Bloomfield, Robert, 3

Bloomsbury Square, 344

Bolingbroke, Henry St. John, Viscount, 26-35, 106

Bolingbroke House, 26-35

Bolt Court, 90, 117

Bond Street, 265

Boner, Charles, 279

Borrow, George, 344

Boswell, James, 59, 71, 79, 81, 82, 85, 86, 93-117, 118, 334

Bouverie Street, 181

Bow Lane, 19

-- Street, 90

Brawne, Fanny, 154, 156, 160, 163, 164, 165

Bread Street, Cheapside, 4, 19

Broad Street, Soho, 9, 118, 119, 130, 167

Bront?, Charlotte, 303

Brooks, Shirley, 316

Brown, Charles Armitage, 154, 164, 166

Browne, Hablot K. ("Phiz"), 316, 323, 328

Browne, Sir Thomas, 4

Browning, Robert, 9, 259, 281, 331, 332, 344

Brunswick Square, 328

Buckingham Street, Euston Road, 135

-- -- Strand, 200, 315

Bunhill Row, 19

Burbage, Richard, 13

Burke, Edmund, 59, 88

Burne-Jones, Sir Edward, 76, 344

Burney, Dr. Charles, 56, 106, 114

-- Fanny, 56

Burns, Robert, 194, 198

Butts, Thomas, 124

Byron, Lord, 9, 67, 68, 155, 167, 193-199, 200, 203, 286, 287, 321, 338, 340

Cade, Jack, 10

Camberwell, 236

Campbell, Thomas, 200

Campden Hill, 334

Cannon Street, 10, 18

Canonbury Tower, 76

Carew, Thomas, 20

Carlyle, Mrs., 279, 285, 286, 292, 318

-- Thomas, 96, 198, 205, 210, 262, 263, 275-286, 291, 292, 293, 294, 296, 303, 304, 317, 321, 343, 344

Carter Lane, 12

Cary, Rev. H. F., 51

Castle Street, Cavendish Square, 89

-- -- Leicester Square, 63

Cattermole, George, 238

Cave, Edward, 88, 102

Chancery Lane, 4, 328

Charing Cross, 3, 4, 224

Charlotte Street, 144, 332

Charterhouse, 94, 188, 281, 296

Chaucer, Geoffrey, 4

Cheapside, 2, 4, 5, 17, 19, 20, 23, 24

Chelsea, 254, 255-293

Cheshire Cheese, the, 108

Chesterfield, Lord, 103-105

Chesterton, G. K., 128

Cheyne Row, 275-286

Cheyne Walk, 254, 255, 256-265, 273-275

Chiswick, 36-51

Christ's Hospital, 200

Churchill, Charles, 6, 44, 47, 48

Cibber, Colley, 28, 344, 347

Clarke, Cowden, 156, 240

-- Mrs. Cowden, 317

Cleveland Street, 314

Clifford's Inn, 220

Cloth Fair, 10

Cobbett, William, 200

Colebrook Row, 219, 220, 221, 223, 224

Coleridge, S. T., 156, 199-206, 208, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 223

College Street, Kentish Town, 163

Collins, Wilkie, 146, 318, 332

Colman, George, 67

Colvin, Sir Sidney, 150

Condell, Henry, 19

Conduit Street, Regent Street, 334

Congreve, William, 150

Constable, John, 143-145, 153

Cornhill, 1, 2, 6

Cornwall, Barry, 216, 238

Coryat, Thomas, 19

Covent Garden, 41, 109, 135, 200, 216, 217, 218

Cowley, Abraham, 4

Cranbourne Street, 38

Craven Street, Strand, 50, 334

Cripplegate, 6, 19

Cross, John, 254

Cruikshank, George, 238, 316, 334, 337

Cumberland Market, 337

Cunningham, Allan, 43, 59

Darwin, Charles, 344

Davies, Thomas, 109, 110, 113

Day, Thomas, 187-193

Dean Street, 41, 167, 338

Defoe, Daniel, 6

Dekker, Thomas, 19

Denmark Hill, 334

Dennis, John, 32, 220

De Quincey, Thomas, 168-177, 206

De Stael, Madame, 167

De Vere Gardens, 331

Devereux Court, 3

Devil Tavern, 19, 108

Devonshire Terrace, 239, 323, 332

Dibdin, Charles, 245

Dickens, Charles, 3, 146, 149, 153, 238, 239, 250, 286, 287, 294, 300, 311, 312, 313, 314-327, 328, 331, 332, 334, 337, 338, 343, 344

-- Mrs., 303, 322

Dilke, Wentworth, 154, 156

Disraeli, Benjamin (Lord Beaconsfield), 167, 338, 344

-- Isaac, 344

Dobson, Austin, 294

Dodsley, Robert, 96

Donne, Dr. John, 4, 19

Doughty Street, 316, 317, 318, 322, 323

Dowden, Dr., 181

Down Street, 280

Dryden, John, 167

Duke Street, 333

Du Maurier, George, 146

Dyer, George, 220, 232

East Smithfield, 4

Edmonton, 8, 225, 226-232

Edwardes Square, 293

Eliot, George, 245-254, 255

Elm Tree Road, 233, 236, 238, 239, 240

Ely Place, 10

Emerson, R. W., 280, 281

Enfield, 223, 225, 226

Exeter Street, 89

Felpham, 127, 136

Fetter Lane, 90

Fielding, Henry, 43, 71, 72

Fields, Ticknor, 303

Finchley Road, 237, 242

Fitzgerald, Edward, 142, 153, 303, 305

-- Percy, 89

Fitzosbert, William, 1

Fitzroy Square, 273

-- Street, 314

Flaxman, John, 120-139, 140, 167

Fleet Street, 4, 8, 89, 108, 109, 181

Fleming, Mrs.,

76, 79

Fletcher, John, 4, 18, 20

Forster, John, 87, 149, 238, 294, 295, 318, 321, 322, 323, 331

Fountain Court, 131, 134

Franklin, Benjamin, 49, 334

Friday Street, 18, 20

Frith Street, 167, 181, 185

Froude, J. A., 279

Fulham Road, 266, 333

Fuller, Thomas, 20

Furnival's Inn, 315, 316

Gad's Hill Place, 315, 324

Gainsborough, Thomas, 64, 67, 130, 153, 337

Gamble, Ellis, 38, 39

Garrick, David, 43, 48, 50, 59, 96, 103, 110, 114, 153

-- Mrs., 114

Garth, Sir Samuel, 31

Gay, John, 31, 150

Gerrard Street, 42, 59, 167

Gibbon, Edward, 328

Gilchrist, Alexander, 123, 124, 131

Gilman, Mr., 156, 223

Globe Theatre, 12, 13, 18, 19

Gloucester Place, 331

Godwin, Mary, 181

-- William, 216

Goldsmith, Oliver, 59, 63, 68, 71, 76, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85, 86, 87, 88, 153

Gore House, Kensington, 338

Gough Square, 90, 95-109

Gower, John, 18

Gower Street, 344

Gray, Thomas, 6

Gray's Inn, 90

Great Coram Street, 296

-- George Street, 333

-- Newport Street, 56

-- Portland Street, 117

-- Queen Street, 117, 118

Greaves, Walter, 260, 262, 273

Greek Street, 168-177

Green Street, 120

Greene, Robert, 13

Grosvenor Square, 328

Half Moon Street, 334

Hall, S. C., 185

Hallam, Arthur, 332

-- Henry, 332

Hamilton, Lady, 142

-- Sir William, 275

Hammersmith, 200, 271, 294

Hampstead, 140-166

Hampstead Road, 314, 334

Hannay, James, 300

Harley Street, 271

Harmsworth, Cecil, 90

Harry, M. Gerard, 266

Hawkesworth, Dr. John, 94, 102, 103

Hawkins, Sir John, 63, 93, 94, 108

Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 294

Haydon, Benjamin, 135, 156, 158, 181, 210

Hayley, William, 124, 134, 140, 142

Hazlitt, Mrs., 220

-- William, 39, 156, 167, 181-186, 200, 203, 204, 205, 207, 216

Heminge, John, 19

Hercules Buildings, Lambeth, 123-124

Hereford Square, 344

Herrick, Robert, 5

Hertford Street, 328

Highgate, 156, 157, 199, 223, 259, 337

Hind, Lewis, 271

Hobbes, Thomas, 3

Hogarth, Mary, 322

-- Mrs., 50-51

-- William, 36-51, 56, 63, 68, 79, 150

Hogg, T. J., 177

Holborn, 90, 226

Holcroft, Thomas, 216

Holland House, 339

Holles Street, 9, 193

Hone, William, 158, 223

Hood, Thomas, 9, 223, 233, 235-245

Hook, Theodore, 332, 338

Hungerford Market, 314

Hunt, Holman, 9

-- Leigh, 68, 153, 155, 156, 158, 210, 285, 286-295, 318, 344

Hunter Street, 334

Irving, Washington, 38

Islington, 76, 79, 219-221

Isola, Emma, 227, 228, 231

Ivy Lane, 94, 108

Jeffrey, Francis, 275

Jerrold, Douglas, 239, 294, 331

Johnson, Mrs., 97, 98, 101

-- Samuel, 3, 33, 43, 50, 52, 59, 60, 63, 68, 71, 72, 79, 81, 82, 86, 88, 89-117, 275

Johnson Street, 314

Johnson's Court, 90

Jonson, Ben, 4, 19, 20

Keats, John, 6, 23, 153-166

Kemble, John, 167

Kemp, William, 13

Kensal Green, 334

Kensington, 293, 296, 299, 303-306, 311, 328, 338, 339

-- Gardens, 300

Kilburn Priory, 331

King Street, Covent Garden, 200

Kingsley, Charles, 255

-- Henry, 255

Kit-Kat Club, 150

Knight, Joseph, 256

Ladbroke Grove Road, 328

Lamb, Charles, 6, 9, 39, 40, 51, 80, 86, 130, 156, 186, 200, 206, 207-232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 240, 241, 287

-- Mary, 209, 213, 215, 216, 220, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 231, 233, 234

Landor, Walter Savage, 208, 338

Landseer, Sir Edwin, 238

Langland, John, 1

Langton, Bennet, 63, 72, 103

Lant Street, 314

Leathersellers' Buildings, 3

Lecky, Mrs., 281

Leech, John, 328

Leicester Square, 38, 39, 49, 52, 59, 60, 63, 81, 86, 88, 117, 120

Lennox, Mrs., 108

Levett, Robert, 102, 103

Lewes, George Henry, 249, 253, 316

Lincoln's Inn Fields, 149, 322

Little College Street, 314

-- Queen Street, 212

Lloyd, Charles, 215

Locke, John, 207

Lombard Street, 6

London Bridge, 24

-- Stone, 10

Loudon Road, 245

Ludgate Hill, 328

Lytton, Lord, 242, 250, 328, 338

Macaulay, Lord, 334, 340

Maclise, Daniel, 149, 239, 255, 331, 338

Macready, W. C., 331

Maiden Lane, 271

Manning, Thomas, 211

Marchmont Street, 181

Marryat, Captain, 238, 333, 338

Marston, Philip Bourke, 9

Marylebone Road, 288, 323, 332

Massinger, Philip, 18

Mathews, Charles, 197

Matthew, Mrs., 120, 134

Mawson Row, Chiswick, 36

Mecklenburgh Square, 316

Medwin, 177

Meredith, George, 255

Mermaid Tavern, 18, 19, 20

Middleton, Thomas, 4

Milbanke, Anna Isabella, 194, 197, 199, 340

Mill, John Stuart, 9, 275

Milnes, Moncton (Lord Houghton), 238

Milton, John, 4, 19

Monkwell Street, 14, 15, 16, 19

Montagu, Lady Mary Wortley, 28

Moore, Thomas, 67, 194

Moorfields, 6, 153

More, Hannah, 114

Morland, George, 337, 338

Morris, William, 37, 344

Mount Street, 178

Mountjoy, Christopher, 14, 15, 16, 17

Moxon, Edward, 227, 228, 231

Mulready, William, 167

Munday, Anthony, 19

Munro, Alexander, 281

Murray, David Christie, 334

-- John, 198

New Street, 135

Newgate Street, 200

Newman Street, Oxford Street, 63

Newton, Sir Isaac, 52-56, 207

Nollekens, Joseph, 39, 140

Norfolk Street, Strand, 200

North Bank, 245

-- End, Fulham, 71, 72, 73

Northcote, James, 167

Old Bond Street, 197, 334

Old Buildings, Lincoln's Inn, 328

Onslow Square, 306

Opie, Mrs., 198

Oxford Street, 168, 169, 174

Palace Green, Kensington, 311

Pall Mall, 64, 200, 205

Parson's Green, 71

Patmore, P. G., 185,

211

Peckham Rye, 118

Peel, Sir Robert, 242, 325

Pennell, Mr. and Mrs. J., 260, 261, 265, 266, 267, 268

Percy, Bishop, 117

-- Street, Tottenham Court Road, 344, 347

Philip, Mrs. and Miss Birnie, 267, 268

Phillips, Sir Richard, 51

Piccadilly, 199, 334

Poland Street, 123, 167, 177, 178

Pope, Alexander, 6, 26-35, 36, 106, 150, 155, 347

Pope's Head Alley, 2

Poultry, the, 9

Praed, W. Mackworth, 88

Prior, Matthew, 3

Putney, 255, 295, 328, 331

Queen Anne Street, 271, 272, 273, 274

Quiney, Richard, 12

Raleigh, Sir Walter, 20

Ralph, James, 36

Reade, Charles, 334

Red Lion Square, 344

Reynolds, John Hamilton, 156, 223

-- Sir Joshua, 33, 56, 59, 60, 63, 64, 67, 81, 86, 88, 103, 110, 114, 117, 130, 141, 153, 271

Richardson, Samuel, 42, 68, 71-75, 97

Ritchie, Lady Thackeray, 299, 300, 305, 306

Robert Street, Adelphi, 223, 233

Roberts, David, 272, 273

Robinson, Crabb, 130, 233

Rogers, Samuel, 67, 145, 194, 200, 203, 205, 339-343

Romney, George, 135, 140-143, 337

Rossetti, Christina, 9

-- Dante Gabriel, 9, 255, 259, 260, 261

-- W. M., 255

Rowan Road, 294

Rowley, William, 19

Ruskin, John, 9, 265, 281, 334

Russell Square, 303

Russell Street, Covent Garden, 109, 216, 217, 218, 219

St. Andrew Undershaft, 10

St. Anne's, Soho, 186

St. Bartholomew the Great, 10

St. Clement Danes, 89, 108

St. Helen's, Bishopsgate, 10

St. James's Place, 339

-- Street, 199

St. John's Wood, 233, 236-245, 253, 254, 288, 331

St. Martin's Street, 52

St. Olave, Silver Street, 15, 16

St. Saviour's, Southwark, 10, 19

Sala, George Augustus, 316, 323, 325, 326, 344, 347

Salisbury Court, 42

Savile Row, 68

Scott, Sir Walter, 145, 197

Seamore Place, 338

Selden, John, 20

Shakespeare, Edmund, 18

-- William, 6, 10-24, 106, 328

Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 156, 167, 177-181, 206, 287, 288, 294

Sheridan, Richard Brinsley, 67, 68, 194, 340, 343

Shirley, James, 4

Silver Street, 14, 16, 17

Smith, Albert, 344, 347

Smith, J. T. ("Rainy Day"), 120, 140

Smith, Sidney, 316, 338

Smollett, Tobias, 255

Soho, 41, 42, 56, 59, 118-123, 130, 167-186, 338

Soho Square, 167, 168

Southampton Street, Camberwell, 331

South Moulton Street, 127, 129, 131

Southey, Robert, 223

Southwark, 10, 11

Spencer, Herbert, 245

Spenser, Edmund, 4

Stanfield, Clarkson, 146, 149, 238, 272

Staple Inn, 10, 90, 109

Steele, Richard, 3, 150, 344

Sterne, Laurence, 334

Stevenson, Robert Louis, 150, 241

Stothard, Thomas, 134, 271

Strand, 6, 7, 8, 90, 105, 131, 315

Stubbs, Bishop, 3

Sullivan, Sir Arthur, 9

Swift, Jonathan, 27, 31, 150

Swinburne, A. C., 9, 255, 327

Talfourd, T. N., 210, 216

Tavistock Square, 324

Taylor, John, 160

Temple Bar, 19

Temple, Rev. T. W., 117

Temple, the, 6, 7, 10, 72, 80, 87, 177, 207, 216, 218, 296, 304

Tennyson, Alfred, Lord, 142, 150, 328, 332

Terrace, the, Kensington, 328

Thackeray, W. M., 88, 153, 208, 242, 296-313, 314, 315, 326, 328, 338

Thames Street, 4, 18

Thomson, James, 27

Thornhill, Sir James, 41, 42, 52, 167

Thrale, Mrs., 63

Thurloe, John, 328

Tite Street, 265, 266

Tower, the, 10

Trollope, Anthony, 312, 313, 326, 334

Turk's Head, 42

Turner, J. M. W., 9, 260, 268-275

Turpin, Dick, 153

Twickenham, 31, 32, 35, 271

Upper Cheyne Row, 286, 288, 291-293

Vale, the, Chelsea, 266

Vine Street, Westminster, 6

Wallace, Charles William, 12, 14, 15

Walpole, Horace, 255, 344

Wanstead, 236

Warburton, William, 33

Wardour Street, 135

Warton, Joseph, 28, 94

Warwick Crescent, 331

Watts, G. F., 262

Watts-Dunton, Theodore, 23, 255

Webster, John, 4

Welbeck Street, 334

Wellclose Square, 187

Wellington Street, Strand, 315, 324

West, Benjamin, 43, 63

Westbrook, Harriett, 178, 181

Westminster, 6, 333

-- Abbey, 10, 134

Whistler, James McNeill, 39, 256, 259-268, 271

Whitefriars Street, 2

Wilderness Row, Clerkenwell, 296

Wilkes, John, 44

Wilkins, George, 15, 19

Williams, Anna, 101, 102, 106

Will's Coffee House, 216

Wimbledon Park Road, 245-253

Wimpole Street, 265, 331, 332

Winchmore Hill, 236

Wine Office Court, 76, 108

Wood Street, Cheapside, 17, 19

Woodstock Street, 89

Wordsworth, William, 7, 8, 145, 205, 208, 216, 220, 222, 225, 226

Yates, Edmund, 309, 310, 311, 312, 316, 331

Young Street, Kensington, 296, 299, 303, 304, 305, 306

Printed by Ballantyne, Hanson & Co.

Edinburgh & London.

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